National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center – Part I

20121118_1_DSC3449_DIGI

No, that’s not a Tomcat, or any other plane with “cat” in its name.  Let me back up a bit.

First of all, this will be the last update of the 2012 photos.  There are other 2012 photos I might showcase in future posts, but as far as my “catching up” efforts for 2012, this will be it.  Well . . . this and a number of other posts.  I have about 270 photographs from the museum, so I will split them up into multiple posts.

Mind you, each post will still be what they now call WordPress Longform.  But, I digress.

Thanksgiving 2012 found us visiting relatives in Maryland.  There, we met four cats.  One of them is showcased above.  I figure a cat picture will attract the chicks, and the title will attract dudes.  While chicks might not hang around for the planes, their short visit will still add to my counter.  The other cats will be introduced in future posts.

During the visit to Maryland, I wanted to see one place, and one place only . . . The National Air & Space Museum, also known as the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.

20121119_1_DSC3530_DIGI

The building itself is pleasant to look at from the outside.  This abstract scythe probably symbolizes the idea of clunky, noisy, smelly, smoke-belching-man-made-machines clumsily lumbering through the air; testaments to man’s desire to fly, them machines be.

20121119_1_DSC3532_DIGI20121119_1_DSC3533_DIGIThat structure is meant to mimic a control tower . . . and, sadly, we forgot to visit it.  It was only as we were leaving that I looked up, and softly said “Next time”.  Then I raised my fist to the heavens, stood tall, and yelled out . . . “Next time, for sure!”

But back to the scythe . . .

20121119_1_DSC3534_DIGI

It was cloudy, so this was not as brilliant as it might have been . . . it did seem to me as if they are compensating for something.

20121119_1_DSC3536_DIGI

The entrance is quite striking, as well . . .

20121119_1_DSC3537_DIGI

“Soilent Green is people!!” . . . sorry, could not help it.

The first thing that greets you as you walk to a balcony looking out to the huge hangar is this Vought F4V Corsair.

Vought F4V Corsair

Vought F4V Corsair

Vought F4V Corsair

Vought F4V Corsair

Something that I plan to do throughout these posts, is to occasionally drop in the Black & White versions of the photos.  Some planes are better suited to them, so only some will get the treatment.

Vought F4V Corsair

Vought F4V Corsair

Meh . . . that was not one of them, but as long as it’s up there (get it? . . . up there . . . nevermind), I’ll leave it in.

The next thing you notice is Lope’s Hope.  It’s a Curtis P40E Warhawk, and in 1947 you could have picked one up for $50.

Curtis P40E Warhawk

Curtis P40E Warhawk

Curtis P40E Warhawk

Curtis P40E Warhawk

This too gets the B&W treatment tryout . . .

Curtis P40E Warhawk

Curtis P40E Warhawk

Hmmm . . . I think from here on in I’ll be more discerning with my choices.

Some readers, those like me, might have immediately noticed what’s center stage on the floor below.

Lockheed SR-71A Blackbird

Lockheed SR-71A Blackbird

A legendary plane, lots can be found about it HERE.  The plaque says this:

20121119_1_DSC3605_DIGI

Yeah, hard to read, but easily read in the accompanying SmugMug Gallery (HERE).

Oh, that’s the other thing about this photo journey through the museum.  I will introduce the plane when I first see it, but it may pop up again from different angles.  Pretty much, the flow of photos will follow my wanderings through the hanger and adjacent halls.

Next up, the Republic F-105D Thunderchief.

20121119_1_DSC3602_DIGI

This was a big plane, and could carry a larger bombs load than the B-17s flown in WW II.

Republic F-105D Thunderchief

Republic F-105D Thunderchief

Republic F-105D Thunderchief

Republic F-105D Thunderchief

Some people might have heard of the Wild Weasels . . . dangerous stuff.  These shots were taken from the walkway winding its way down to the hanger floor, as is this next one shot, at cockpit level.

Republic F-105 Thunderchief

Republic F-105 Thunderchief

Continuing down the ramp, I passed a familiar sight . . .

Bell UH-1H Iroquois (Huey)

Bell UH-1H Iroquois (Huey)

Bell UH-1H Iroquois (Huey)

Bell UH-1H Iroquois (Huey)

Bell UH-1H Iroquois (Huey)

Bell UH-1H Iroquois (Huey)

20121119_1_DSC3598_DIGI

One can read about Hueys HERE.

Once on the main floor, one can look up for a different perspective on both the P40E Warhawk . . .

Curtis P40E Warhawk

Curtis P40E Warhawk

Curtis P40E Warhawk

Curtis P40E Warhawk

. . . and other aircraft hanging up there.

The Corsair is closest, and the Warhawk is after that.

The Corsair is closest, and the Warhawk is after that.

A Westland Lysander brings up the rear.  From the ground, you can also find out about the weird looking thing hanging up there . . .

NASA Oblique Wing Research Aircraft

NASA Oblique Wing Research Aircraft

20121119_1_DSC3556_DIGI

NASA Oblique Wing Research Aircraft

NASA Oblique Wing Research Aircraft

And you also get a different perspective on the SR-71A Blackbird.

SR-71A Blackbird

SR-71A Blackbird

SR-71A Blackbird

SR-71A Blackbird

At the bottom of the ramp is also where you will find the engine display.  That’s what I’m close out this post with . . . engines.

Engines drive the human world like no other thing, but are, for the most part, unseen. Here you can see them in all their glory, and you can even see a few cutaway engines, showing their guts, so to speak.

20121119_1_DSC3574_DIGI 20121119_1_DSC3576_DIGI 20121119_1_DSC3583_DIGI 20121119_1_DSC3584_DIGI 20121119_1_DSC3586_DIGI 20121119_1_DSC3587_DIGI 20121119_1_DSC3589_DIGI 20121119_1_DSC3591_DIGI 20121119_1_DSC3593_DIGI

For them who are interested, I remind them the above photos are available in higher resolution at the SmugMug Gallery HERE.

The next post will deal with older stuff.  Thanks for visiting, and hope it was an informative foray into a small part of aviation history.

 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o o o o o o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Vasectomy

Vasectomy

Astute persons might have noticed these doodles, and correctly surmised they hold some significance for me, and perhaps for humanity at large.  

If you click on the doodle, and nothing happens, this is the link it’s supposed to go to: https://disperser.wordpress.com/2011/12/26/palm-vx-and-i/.

<><><><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><><><>

Note: if you are not reading this blog post at Disperser.Wordpress.com, know that it has been copied without permission, and likely is being used by someone with nefarious intention, like attracting you to a malware-infested website.  Could be they also torture small mammals.

<><><><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><><><>

Please, if you are considering bestowing me some recognition beyond commenting below, refrain from doing so.  I will decline nominations whereby one blogger bestows an award onto another blogger, or group of bloggers.   I appreciate the intent behind it, but I would much prefer a comment thanking me for turning you away from a life of crime, religion, or making you a better person in some other way.  That would actually mean something to me.

Should you still nominate me, I will strongly suspect you pulled my name at random, and that you are not, in fact, a reader of my blog.  If you wish to know more, please read below.

About awards: Blogger Awards          About “likes”:   Of “Likes”, Subscriptions, and Stuff

Note: to those who may click on “like”, or rate the post; if you do not personally hear from me, know that I am sincerely appreciative, and I thank you for noticing what I do.

. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.

About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Airplanes/Aeroplanes, Black and White, Machines, Photography Stuff and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center – Part I

  1. oneowner says:

    I don’t know about the other chicks and dudes but I dug both the cat and the planes, especially the Blackbird and P51. I’m ex-Air Force so, yeah, I do dig airplanes. Nice work

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Lot’s more to come in this series . . . and then, maybe, I’ll tackle the ones from The Boeing Museum in Seattle . . . or maybe the photos from Dayton’s Air Force Museum.

      We’ll see.

      Oh, and thanks.

      Like

  2. Looks like an interesting place to visit. My favorites are the warhawks.

    Like

  3. Carissa says:

    I find airplane engines fascinating. So many parts!

    Love the kitty too. Reminds me of one of mine from a way back in time.

    Like

  4. AnnMarie says:

    Excellent shot of the Blackbird (the one before the engines) . . . could have been an entry in the Digital Lightroom Lines contest. The building(s) look as interesting as the items they display.

    Like

  5. drawandshoot says:

    You crack me up, Emilio. : )
    Cat photographs don’t really do anything for me – I guess that makes me immune to about half the internet…
    Love the planes, though! Your photographs are great, nice architectural compositions too. We have an aviation museum here in Ottawa and I love it.

    Like

  6. Chillbrook says:

    Smashing post Emilio! Anything aviation related I just love and these photographs are superb!

    Like

  7. colonialist says:

    You have presented a fabulous show!
    The Corsair reminds me of one of the models I was proudest to complete when young – that gull-wing provided quite a challenge in construction.

    Like

  8. I like this cat too. And the architectue is impressive and interesting.

    Like

Voice your opinion

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.