The “Y” stories voting block is going pretty well so this will be the last reminder for a few (or more) days.

If you are a regular reader of our stories, and if you feel like it, forward this post to someone who might enjoy them (and vote). Your friend — and even your enemies — will appreciate it, and the writers will be grateful. 

And, as usual, if you’re a regular reader of our stories and someone who votes, thank you in advance for casting a vote for your favorite of the three. Links to the stories and the poll for voting for “Alphabet Challenge Y-Stories” are HERE(link). Votes will be accepted until  Noon (Central Time) on Monday, March 15th, 2021.

Side Note: while this blog’s first post was on the 19th of March, 2010, yesterday — March 6th — was the day I created this blog. Why the delay? I tried out Blogger and Live Journal before settling on WordPress. Why mention this? Because; just because.

So, model planes . . . well, sculptures, really . . . .

Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress

I’m going back to 2010 for these three photos (with multiple versions of each photo). The first plane, above, is the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress(link). That photo is as-shot (Nikon D200 camera).

The planes are in what is known as the Cadet Honor Court at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado. These planes are all sculpted by one person (LINK).

The “Y” stories voting block is live and running, and because we’ve been gone for so long, I plan a few extra reminders, this being the first (hence the title).

As usual, if you like a particular story, in addition to voting for it — and if you feel like it — forward it to friends and family. Ideally, they should read all three and make up their mind, but it’s OK if you sway them to your opinion . . . as long as they still vote.

No matter how one comes to the stories, if you’re a reader of our stories and someone who votes, thank you in advance for casting a vote for your favorite of the three. Links to the stories and the poll for voting for “Alphabet Challenge Y-Stories” are HERE(link). Votes will be accepted until  Noon (Central Time) on Monday, March 15th, 2021.

So, model plane . . . .

I’m going back to 2009 for this photo of a plane that has appeared numerous times on this blog. Normally, it’s shown sitting atop a post in the plaza right outside the Air Force Academy Chapel, along with other scale models of famous planes.

This post documents our September 14, 2017, visit to Ketchikan, Alaska, a long-delayed continuation of my documentation of our 2017 Alaska Cruise. Current and previous posts relating to this cruise are HERE(link).

There’s a gallery at the end of each post and a SmugMug gallery HERE(link). Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery will eventually contain all the photos from Ketchikan; those from this post (Part 2) and those from previous Ketchikan posts.

You can click on the photos in the body of this post to see a larger-but-less-than-full-size-version. If there’s a panorama, I’ll link the full-size files but be warned . . . they’re typically huge. Huger than people have ever seen before. Don’t click on those links unless you’re enjoying a biggly Interweb connection. Also, if you have biggly Interweb but you’re reading this on a phone — which is sad — VERY SAD — I wouldn’t bother with the full-size photos because they are HUGE; huger than anyone else’s huge photos. 

Ketchikan welcome sign

This post documents our September 14, 2017, visit to Ketchikan, Alaska, a long-delayed continuation of my documentation of our 2017 Alaska Cruise. Current and previous posts relating to this cruise are HERE(link).

There’s a gallery at the end of each post and a SmugMug gallery HERE(link). Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery will eventually contain all the photos from Ketchikan; those from this post (Part 1) and those from other Ketchikan posts.

You can click on the photos in the body of this post to see a larger-but-less-than-full-size-version. If there’s a panorama, I’ll link the full-size files but be warned . . . they’re typically huge. Huger than people have ever seen before. Don’t click on those links unless you’re enjoying a biggly Interweb connection. Also, if you have biggly Interweb but you’re reading this on a phone — which is sad; VERY SAD — I wouldn’t bother with the full-size photos because they are HUGE; huger than anyone else’s huge photos. 

Ketchikan welcome sign

The Alphabet Challenge “R” Stories voting round is heading into the final four days of voting, still stalled. We’re hoping for a few more votes to come in, but (being busy myself) I understand why votes (and voters) may lag. 

Regardless, if you are a reader of our stories and someone who votes, thank you in advance for casting a vote for your favorite of the three. Links to the stories and the poll for voting for “Alphabet Challenge R-Stories” are HERE.<<<Link Votes will be accepted until noon on October 20th.

And now, onto an eclectic mix of photographs . . .

You’re looking at the balloons for a balloon drop event on the Coral Princess during our 2017 Alaska cruise. Said cruise is still being documented . . . maybe I should get back to doing that and put it to bed since there are photos from two other cruises that still need processing (Panama crossing, and New England & Canada cruises).

The Alphabet Challenge “P” Stories voting has — with apparent reluctance — started back up and we’re getting a trickle of readers wanting to make their preference known. 

If you are one such reader, thank you in advance for eventually reading our stories and for eventually casting a vote for your favorite of the three. Links to the stories and the poll for voting for “Alphabet Challenge P-Stories” are HERE.<<<Link

So, Outside . . .

That’s the color version of the Queen Mary in Long Beach, CA . . . but it seems to me this might be a more suitable version . . .

The color photographs version of this post is HERE.<<link

This post is identical except most of the photos have been replaced by monochrome versions. Also, the word “monochrome” has been added where appropriate.

For them who didn’t read the previous monochrome post, I done do this to avoid mixing what are two different ways of presenting photographs. I aim to let each version shine on its own stage. Think of it as a nod to the days before color was invented . . .

This is the second (monochrome) post documenting our September 13, 2017, visit to Juneau, Alaska, a now even longer-delayed continuation of my documentation of our 2017 Alaska Cruise. Current and previous posts relating to this cruise are HERE<<link. The following introduction is the same as that of previous posts so that’s something else you can skip.

One more thing . . . there are fewer monochrome photos than color photos, so the posts are not exactly 1:1 comparable. In part, that’s because some of the color photos are duplicates taken with the Note II and there’s nothing gained by converting them to monochrome, and some of the photos were not all that interesting in Monochrome.

There’s a gallery at the end of each post and a SmugMug gallery HERE<<link. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery will eventually contain all the photos from Juneau; those from this (monochrome) post (Part 2) and those from previous (monochrome) Juneau posts.

You can click on the photos in the body of this post to see a larger-but-less-than-full-size-version. If there’s a panorama, I’ll link the full-size files but be warned . . . they’re typically huge. Huger than people have ever seen before. Don’t click on those links unless you’re enjoying a biggly Interweb connection. Also, if you have biggly Interweb but you’re reading this on a phone — which is sad; VERY SAD — I wouldn’t bother with the full-size photos because they are HUGE; huger than anyone else’s huge photos. 

This is the second post documenting our September 13, 2017, visit to Juneau, Alaska, a long-delayed continuation of my documentation of our 2017 Alaska Cruise. Current and previous posts relating to this cruise are HERE<<link. The following introduction is the same as that of previous posts so that’s something else you can skip.

There’s a gallery at the end of each post and a SmugMug gallery HERE<<link. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery will eventually contain all the photos from Juneau; those from this post (Part 1) and those from this Juneau posts.

You can click on the photos in the body of this post to see a larger-but-less-than-full-size-version. If there’s a panorama, I’ll link the full-size files but be warned . . . they’re typically huge. Huger than people have ever seen before. Don’t click on those links unless you’re enjoying a biggly Interweb connection. Also, if you have biggly Interweb but you’re reading this on a phone — which is sad; VERY SAD — I wouldn’t bother with the full-size photos because they are HUGE; huger than anyone else’s huge photos. 

The previous Juneau 2017 post is HERE.<<link

That post has color photos and rather than mix color and monochrome photos, I decided to duplicate the post with the monochrome versions of the photos. Think of it as a nod to the days before color was invented . . .

This is the first (monochrome) post documenting our September 13, 2017, visit to Juneau, Alaska, a now even longer-delayed continuation of my documentation of our 2017 Alaska Cruise. Current and previous posts relating to this cruise are HERE<<link. The following introduction is the same as that of previous posts so that’s something else you can skip.

There’s a gallery at the end of each post and a SmugMug gallery HERE<<link. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery will eventually contain all the (monochrome) photos from Juneau; those from this (monochrome) post (Part 1) and those from subsequent Juneau posts.

You can click on the photos in the body of this post to see a larger-but-less-than-full-size-version. If there’s a panorama, I’ll link the full-size files but be warned . . . they’re typically huge. Huger than people have ever seen before. Don’t click on those links unless you’re enjoying a biggly Interweb connection. Also, if you have biggly Interweb but you’re reading this on a phone — which is sad; VERY SAD — I wouldn’t bother with the full-size photos because they are HUGE; huger than anyone else’s huge photos. 

I’m writing this on the 28th of July, 2020 . . . my last post about our 2017 Alaska Cruise was exactly one year ago (HERE<<link) and covered the last of the Haines photos. Had I been aware of it, I would have tried to post on the anniversary of my last post . . . alas, there’s no way I’ll finish this in the next ninety minutes.

This is the first post documenting our September 13, 2017, visit to Juneau, Alaska, a now even longer-delayed continuation of my documentation of our 2017 Alaska Cruise. Current and previous posts relating to this cruise are HERE<<link. The following introduction is the same as that of previous posts so that’s something else you can skip.

There’s a gallery at the end of each post and a SmugMug gallery HERE<<link. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery will eventually contain all the photos from Juneau; those from this post (Part 1) and those from subsequent Juneau posts.

You can click on the photos in the body of this post to see a larger-but-less-than-full-size-version. If there’s a panorama, I’ll link the full-size files but be warned . . . they’re typically huge. Huger than people have ever seen before. Don’t click on those links unless you’re enjoying a biggly Interweb connection. Also, if you have biggly Interweb but you’re reading this on a phone — which is sad; VERY SAD — I wouldn’t bother with the full-size photos because they are HUGE; huger than anyone else’s huge photos. 

Twenty-three visitors viewed the 1500 words challenge post but only two voted. I mean, I get it; it was a holiday. An eating holiday, at that. In retrospect, that wasn’t what one might call good timing. Same for today; people immersed in a spending frenzy aren’t likely to spend their break reading stories and pondering on the relative merits of the narratives before casting a vote.

Still, them Readers Awards won’t mean much if there are no actual readers voting. So, if you can muster the physical and mental energy for it, please read the short stories and cast your vote before noon, December 4th. 

At 1,500 words, reading each story should take no more than seven minutes to read and I realize that’s a huge time commitment in these days of near-instant gratification.

And that’s enough of that . . .

Today’s post is about an old hawk. Not age-wise old; photo old, as in 2012. This was a rare capture for me; a hawk who dropped from above onto a random spot in the snow. I missed the actual moment, but I have the aftermath . . .

So, not a big fan of cities. We’ve been to Boston a few times and generally avoid spending time in the city.

Now, I know people’s inner indignant-Boston-fans are struggling to get out of their lazy chairs and ready to battle me on this; historic sites, unique architecture, things to do . . . yes . . . and ho-hum. None of those got us off the boat.

We went by this as we docked and for sure I thought we’d be able to walk to it . . . and would have except for the fact there was no direct walking path to it. Too bad.