Many of today’s bitter arguments, nee discussions, are on issues that allow — no, demand — only binary answers: Yes, No, Right, Wrong, True, False.

Isn’t it true that surgeons cut patients and sometimes cause patients to die?

Yes, but—

NO BUTS! Surgeons are awful people!

Everyone recognizes the weakness of the argument. It may well be surgeons are awful people, but for reasons completely independent from them cutting into and mucking about in people’s insides.

That extreme example exemplifies the level of debate for many contentious issues.

Abortion and guns are two issues that come to mind; issues framed as being binary but aren’t.

So, yesterday I posted a quick observation about the state of comments on this blog (and maybe blogs in general, based on some of the feedback).

I might have come across as rueful of the situation, hence let me clarify a few things because I fear unintended consequences from that post . . .

Namely, I fear an increase in comments due to people (consciously or unconsciously) thinking I was pressuring them (consciously or unconsciously) to comment more often.

Well, let me set the record straight . . .

Yup, still busy . . . these days are just flying by and before I know it, it’s late at night. So, more samples of photos that will appear in future posts (with others, of course). Yesterday morning, a few Northern Mocking birds frolicked in my backyard . . .

They gave me lots of opportunities to get decent photos both with the D7500 (above) and the P900 (below).

Of all the books I’ve read that contained math, science, and the practical application of the two, the book by Randall Munroe, What If? <<link, was the most enjoyable and the most informative.

It also gave me an insight into the mind and thought process of the guy who writes the xkcd comics <<link.

The above is his entry when the 1982 Exxon Memo to Management about CO2 Greenhouse Effect (LINK) was made public. The link contains a link to the original PDF.