In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I continue with photos from June of 2012. Depending on how you count them, Colorado has a few mountains (53 or 58) topping 14,000 feet in elevation (4,270 meters), and a few of them (two) have roads allowing people — people like me — to drive to their summits. Pikes Peak is one of them Fourteeners, and Mount Evans is the other and the subject of this post.

The original post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post has the coda “Alpine Flowers”. That’s because there are other posts covering other aspects of our visit. For now, I’m sharing the 57 photos from THIS Gallery. As one might gather from the title, this has to do with flowers . . . Flowers growing in the Alpine Tundra.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient since I don’t know how fast theyll load.

I won’t bother naming all the flowering plants on this gallery since anyone interested can read the blog post or visit the gallery for that information, but here’s some general info . . .

“Alpine” is not specifically referring to the Alps, but rather to the area above the tree line (around 12,000 feet in Colorado. . . until the climate changes). It’s the elevation at which trees have too short a growing season. This may be due to low moisture, too low a temperature, or persistent snowpack. The alpine terrain is known as the tundra.

The photos in this gallery are typical of the growth found in this environment.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I continue with photos from June of 2012. Depending on how you count them, Colorado has a few mountains (53 or 58) topping 14,000 feet in elevation (4,270 meters), and a few of them (two) have roads allowing people — people like me — to drive to their summits. Pikes Peak is one of them Fourteeners, and Mount Evans is the other and the subject of this post.

The original post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post has the coda “Sub-Alpine Flowers”. That’s because there are other posts covering other aspects of our visit. For now, I’m sharing the 54 photos from THIS Gallery. As one might gather from the title, this has to do with flowers . . . Flowers growing below the Alpine Tundra.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient since I don’t know how fast theyll load.

Adjacent to the Mt. Goliath Natural Area mentioned last week, there’s the Dos Chappell Nature Center. From the site:

Once you’ve viewed the exhibits, explore the nearby rock gardens and examine the small wildflowers in bloom behind the nature center. Experience an enchanted forest of old gnarled trees by traveling through the quarter-mile Bristlecone Loop Trail. The building, exhibits, and grounds are the result of a cooperative effort between Denver Botanic Gardens, Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado, and the U.S. Forest Service. 

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I continue with photos from June of 2012. Depending on how you count them, Colorado has a few mountains (53 or 58) topping 14,000 feet in elevation (4,270 meters), and a few of them (two) have roads allowing people — people like me — to drive to their summits. Pikes Peak is one of them Fourteeners, and Mount Evans is the other and the subject of this post.

The original post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post has the coda “The Woods“. That’s because there are other posts covering other aspects of our visit. For now, I’m sharing the 37 photos from THIS Gallery. As one might gather from the title, this has to do with trees . . . trees made of wood.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient since I don’t know how fast theyll load.

Until you get above the tree line (approximately 12,000 feet), there are few places where one can see distant scenery through the trees, but mostly you see trees.

I like trees . . . and I especially like the trunks of trees. I mean, I like leaves, too, but usually only at certain times of the year. Unless they are super-duper-interesting leaves.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I offer photos from June of 2012. Depending on how you count them, Colorado has a few mountains (53 or 58) topping 14,000 feet in elevation (4,270 meters), and a few of them (two) have roads allowing people — people like me — to drive to their summits. Pikes Peak is one of them Fourteeners, and Mount Evans is the other and the subject of this post.

The original post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post has the coda “The Scenery“. That’s because there are other posts covering other aspects of our visit. For now, I’m sharing the 108 photos from THIS Gallery.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient as I don’t know how fast theyll load.

Until you get above the tree line (approximately 12,000 feet), there are few places where one can see scenery through the trees, but mostly you see trees.

Lots of aspens, so it would make for a nice fall color tour . . . but we never returned to it, so that’s an opportunity lost. But, on with the post . . .

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Once again, as a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I offer photos from 2008. Specifically, the Fall of 2008, when we set out on a Colorado (read: aspens) color tour. A long-weekend tour, since we were, at the time, both working.

The post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post is titled “Looking Back“. That’s because I’d previously shared the photos via e-mail (in the days before the blog), and I wasn’t completely happy with my processing (Google Gallery). So, in 2018, I reprocessed them . . . and I think I could do even better now. But, for now, I’m sharing the 138 photos on THIS Gallery as they are.

Here’s the thing about leaving Colorado . . . there are many things we don’t miss, but the scenery isn’t one of them.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As mentioned Sunday, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I offer two short galleries of photos from Colorado. The first is documented in THIS post, and it’s from July 2005. It coincided with the first visitors we had after moving there. As is our wont, we went on a drive.

Here’s the thing . . . it may not seem like it, but 2005 was a long time ago when it comes to my photography. I snapped 32 photos, of which 27 are included in the SmugMug Gallery (HERE).

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

After two Sundays covering over 1,100 photos, we’ll get down to more reasonable numbers.

Regular readers know we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, but it might be news to new readers. OK, OK . . . I have no new readers. But, let me ask you this, regular readers: did you know I snapped a lot of photos while living in Colorado?

You did? . . . well, then this might be boring . . .

The name in the car should give a strong hint as to the location, but if not, you can read THIS post to learn more . . . or keep reading below to get the gist of the original post.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

If you thought last week’s massive gallery was . . . er . . . massive, this week’s gallery is even more hugerlier . . . 650 photos! You read that correctly: six-hundred-fifty photos. In Italian, seicentocinquanta foto. For my one Icelandic reader, sex hundruð og fimmtíu myndir.

There are no specific blog posts associated with these photos, a small blessing because it would be a chore to link them all. Rather, again, these photos were used in the various posts reminding people to vote for the 26 Alphabet Challenge rounds. If you haven’t heard about the Alphabet Challenge, that is a great link to follow because it points to all 78 stories.

And, if you have not read the reminder posts, you have yet another hugerly and diverse gallery to peruse. A gallery that ranges from artistic renderings of photos . . .

. . . to more examples of artistic renderings of photos . . .

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

One gallery this week for a total of (!) 524 (!) photos. You read that correctly: five-hundred-twenty-four photos. In Italian, cinquecentoventiquattro foto. For my one Icelandic reader, fimm hundruð tuttugu og fjórar myndir.

There are no specific blog posts associated with these photos, a small blessing because it would be a chore to link them all. Rather, these photos were used in the various posts reminding people to vote for the 26 Alphabet Challenge rounds. If you haven’t heard about the Alphabet Challenge, that is a great link to follow because it points to all 78 stories.

And, if you have not read the reminder posts, you have a huge and diverse gallery to peruse. A gallery that ranges from ‘regular’ photos . . .

. . . to sometimes highly stylized photos

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Two Galleries this week for a total of 71 photos.

There are two blog posts associated with the photos — HERE, and HERE — and the photo galleries are HERE and HERE.

Most photos were taken with the P900, A few with the D7000, and there might be a few here snapped with the Note II. Sometimes, you can’t tell them apart.

We begin with a small gallery in tribute to Paniolos. When people think of Hawaiʻi, they’re probably not thinking Cowboys, or more accurately, Paniolos. And yet, the influence of the culture is present on all the islands. 

There’s interesting reading to be had about Paniolos competing in the 1908 Chayenne Rodeo on the mainland, and winning.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Only one gallery this week, a bit longer than last week’s offering; 83 photos.

There’s one blog post associated with the photos — HERE — and the photo gallery is HERE.

The photos were taken with the D7000, the P900, and the Samsung Note 8. Sometimes, you can’t tell them apart.

That’s the Note 8

Anyway, the gallery is about visiting Kapaʻau, a town in the Kohala district of the Big Island.

That’s not it . . . that’s a photo taken outside the front door of our condo using the Note 8. Pretty impressive what that phone could do. Then again, Hawaiʻi . . .

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Only one gallery this week . . . and, in contrast to last week’s, a short one. Just 22 photos and four videos.

There’s one blog post associated with the photos — HERE — and the photo gallery is HERE.

The photos and videos were shot with the D7000.

The place is Laupāhoehoe Beach Park on the Big Island. Site of a deadly tsunami, it’s a bit of a drive both to get there from where we were staying and to get down to the park itself (narrow 1.5-lane road winding down the side of a cliff).

When you stand on the shore, the waves coming at you look taller than you, obscuring the horizon and making you think they’re going to inundate the ground you stand on . . . but the rocks break them up . . .

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Only one gallery this week . . . with 311 photos!

Well, not really . . . there are only 288 photos, and the rest are animations using some of those photos.

There’s one blog post associated with the photos — HERE — and the photo gallery is HERE.

The photos were shot with the D7000 coupled with the Nikon 80-400mm lens as most of the surfers were out there a bit, and this was pre-P900, so it’s DSLR from start to finish.

As interesting as that photo is, there are many photos, and for this post, I’ll limit myself to mostly the animations from the photos. Anyone interested in perusing the photos can visit the gallery.

There are a lot of action shots, so if you’re into waves and surfing, the gallery is the place for you. Here are a few before I jump to the animations, and, by the way, you can click on any photo or animation to open a larger version in a new window . . .

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Only one gallery this week, but still a total of 140 photos! There are three posts associated with these photos — HERE, HERE, and HERE — and the photo gallery is HERE. As some of the photos are about the same subjects, they might seem repetitive . . . but, that’s how you learned the multiplication tables, right? Meaning, that’s not all bad.

The gallery has a mix of photos; some shot with the P900, some shot with the D7000, and some with my then Note 8. As I mentioned in the first post, shooting with three cameras made me feel like I was a real photographer.

“I was scanning through the pics quickly as is my wont I felt sure I saw it move so I scrolled back and sure enough it keeps moving, my initial thought was “doesn’t this bloke have anything better to do” and second ” how the hell did he do that?”

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Two galleries again this week, for a total of 140 photos! The post associated with the first set of photos is HERE, and the photo gallery is HERE. Again, many of the photos are similar to each other, hence why I’ll add photos from another gallery after these.

These were all shot with the D7000 during one of our drives on my favorite road on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi: Saddle Road.

“All I see are rocks. Specifically, lava rocks. Where’s the road?”