As mentioned, these posts are a chance for me to get my D100 and D200 out, make sure the batteries are charged and there’s a fresh CF memory card waiting to receive photos, and go out and shoot with them old workhorses.

So, this is the first of these posts where I’m actually doing what I said I would do . . . namely, photograph stuff using the old cameras. Unfortunately, I picked a very difficult subject — ice!

D100

Worse, I made a couple of rookie mistakes (didn’t have VR on, didn’t check my speed and ISO settings).

And of the two cameras — the D100 and the D200 — the D100 suffered most. I’m still going to use these, but the next effort will be more representative of what the cameras can do.

One other thing . . . the D100 is a 6MP camera. That means that a full-size photo is ~3000×2000 pixels. The D200 is a 10MP camera (~3400×2300 pixels). In contrast, the D7500 photos are ~5500×3700 pixels. The dimensions are approximate because I’m rounding the numbers.

While it may seem those dimensions are not substantially different, in practice, it makes a lot of difference. For instance, the above photo is 60% of the full-size version. If I do a full-size crop, this is what I get . . .

As mentioned, these posts are a chance for me to get my D100 and D200 out, make sure the batteries are charged and there’s a fresh CF memory card waiting to receive photos, and go out and shoot with them old workhorses.

Instead, once again, I decided to continue with the photos recently salvaged from the D200’s memory card. Today, more photos from 2013. A few photos from Yellowstone National Park that I missed last week, and flowers from our yard in Colorado.

Yellowstone 2013 — Bighorn Sheep (female)

Per my current workflow, that’s been processed through PureRaw, Luminar AI, Color Efex Pro 4, and Lightroom. It sounds like a lot, but most of it is automated. It’s only the finishing touches in Lightroom CC that are interactive.

All these shots were taken with the D200 and the Nikon 80-400mm lens at maximum zoom (600mm equivalent) . . .

As mentioned, these posts are a chance for me to get my D100 and D200 out, make sure the batteries are charged and there’s a fresh CF memory card waiting to receive photos, and go out and shoot with them old workhorses.

Instead, once again, I decided to continue with the photos salvaged from the D200’s memory card. Specifically, photos from our 2013 visit to Yellowstone National Park.

Yellowstone 2013 — Raw image processed in DxO PureRaw

That’s pretty much the photo as it came out of the camera, and before I post-processed it. It’s worth reminding readers that I set my cameras to neutral settings (no brightness, contrast, noise reduction, sharpening, etc). Hence, out of the camera, the photos look kind of blah (as evidenced above).

However, I have a number of processors at my disposal, so let me try a few . . .

As mentioned, these posts are a chance for me to get my D100 and D200 out, make sure the batteries are charged and there’s a fresh CF memory card waiting to receive photos, and go out and shoot with them old workhorses.

I did go out and shot about 10 photos each with the D100 and the D200, specifically for this post. The thing is, it was cloudy and there wasn’t a whole lot of interesting stuff to shoot. I’ll probably share the photos eventually, but for now, something more interesting (I hope).

I went to check the memory in the D200 before shooting, and there were photos on the card from 2015, 2017, and 2019. These photos are from 2015.

Specifically, from the United States Air Force Academy 2015 graduation Thunderbirds show.

For them not interested in reading, you can see the photos in THIS<<link SmugMug Gallery.  

For a SmugMug slideshow click HERE<<link  When you click the link, it will open in a new window and you have two options:
1) Manually scroll through the photos by clicking the “<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos.
2) There’s a PLAY/PAUSE button/symbol at the top-left of the screen with the transition set at about 5 seconds. Note: clicking the PLAY arrow will run a full-screen slideshow. You can then still use the”<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos as this will pause the slideshow.

The first post in this two posts series is at this LINK. In that post, I specified that the photos in the SmugMug Gallery are the same size as what was in the blog post.

Well, no longer . . . these reworked photos were run through Topaz Lab Gigapixels AI to double their size. That means that even a crop of the photo is still substantial For example, this photo (JPG output of the RAW file as it came out of the D7000 camera) . . . .

Turns into this cropped, cleaned, enlarged, and processed photo . . .