In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Today’s stroll on memory lane is a quick one . . .

The original post for these photos is HERE, and the photos are from THIS Gallery.

These photos are from ten years ago, so some of the items might not currently be on display.

I’m referring to photos from the National Air & Space Museum, A. K. A. the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center.

As far as airplane museums go, it’s pretty good. Hard to say if it’s the best because I had pretty good experiences visiting a number of airplane museums. Still, you know, it’s the National museum.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Today’s stroll on memory lane is a quick one . . .

The original post for the bird photos is HERE, and the photos are from THIS Gallery. The original post for the ship photos is HERE, and the photos are from THIS Gallery.

These photos are from our Thanksgiving 2011 visit and close out the review of galleries from our two visits to Galveston Bay.

I’ll begin with the smaller gallery (only 11 photos) of the ships crisscrossing the bay.

As can be seen, the ships often looked as if they would produce an interesting opportunity to photograph a collision . . . but it was not so, at least not while I was there.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Today’s stroll on memory lane is a quick one . . .

The original post for these photos is HERE. In this post, I’m sharing the video and photos from THIS Gallery. The photos are the same San Leon photos I’ve recently shared, except they’re converted to monochrome.

The gallery opens with a video which is a slideshow of the pictures in the gallery . . . why is that, you ask?

Because the post linked above consisted of just one photo and that video, which was uploaded to the WordPress Media Library. As I began running out of room in the Media Library, I replaced the video in the post with the YouTube link of the same video.

I know, it sounds confusing . . . basically, the video in the SmugMug Gallery is now redundant. Except the video is set to music, whereas the slideshow linked at the end of the post has no music.

Again, super-confusing . . . look, here’s the video.

If you’ve watched the video, you’re basically done . . . unless you want to see a few photos from that video.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Today’s gallery continues with more photos from our visit to San Leon, TX. It wasn’t a pleasure visit (See Related Post), and when things got to me, I would step out on the deck, turn off my mind, and watch — and photograph — the sights and listen to the sounds of the Galveston Bay. I’ve covered the main attraction, the pelicans, the rest of the birds, and now the rest of the sights, referencing the appropriately titled San Leon — The Rest of the Story post.

The original post for these photos is HERE. In this post, I’m sharing the photos and videos from three galleries: THIS Gallery and THIS Gallery, and THIS Gallery.

Any videos in the Galleries that had been shared in the post were converted to YouTube since they take up a lot of storage, and WordPress is too cheap to provide a sensible upgrade to the storage limits they impose. If I link the YouTube videos below, know that you can also watch them in the Gallery (it’s the same videos).

So, there are many birds in this post (see the video), but they’re incidental to showing the boats.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Today’s gallery continues with more photos from our visit to San Leon, TX. It wasn’t a pleasure visit (See Related Post), and when things got to me, I would step out on the deck, turn off my mind, and watch — and photograph — the sights and listen to the sounds of the Galveston Bay. I’ve covered the main attraction, the pelicans, and this post is appropriately titled San Leon — The Other Birds.

The original post for these photos is HERE. In this post, I’m sharing the 50 photos and one video from two galleries: THIS Gallery and THIS Gallery.

The video in the gallery appears in the original post as a YouTube video, and really, it’s more of a slideshow of different images. I’ll insert below, but you can also go to the original post or see the version in the Gallery (it’s the same video).

To the best of my knowledge, I try and identify most of the birds. If you find them in error, let me know.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Today’s gallery covers some of the photos from our visit to San Leon, TX. It wasn’t a pleasure visit (See Related Post), and when things got to me, I would step out on the deck, turn off my mind, and watch — and photograph — the sights and listen to the sounds of the Galviston Bay. Some of them sights were Pelicans.

The year was 2011, and we — Melisa and I— spent a little over a week there. The original post for these photos is HERE. In this post, I’m sharing the 83 photos and videos from THIS Gallery.

The videos in the gallery appear in the original post as YouTube videos. I’ll insert some here, but if you want to see all the videos, go to the original post or watch them in the gallery.

The title of the blog post is The Bad Boys of San Leon. The name was coined by Melisa, referring to their “cruising” up and down the shoreline.  They appear silently, stream by in long lines looking all tough and serious, and disappear as silently as they appeared.

Remember to view at high definition

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Today’s gallery covers some of the photos from my first visit to Colorado.

The year was 2004, and we — Melisa and I—headed West searching for a place we could move to. We also had Pops in tow.

The original post for these photos is HERE. In this post, I’m sharing the 31 photos from THIS Gallery.

Yes, not too many photos this week. I figure readers needed a break from some of the recent large galleries.

It was October of 2004, and we were on a grand loop drive . . . we went to Illinois to pick up Melisa’s dad, then drove to Colorado Springs, then to Bozeman, Montana, then back to Chicago, and home to Michigan.

This is the first photo I took in Colorado, coming into Colorado Springs on Highway 24. That, of course, is Pikes Peak (will eventually share some of those galleries as well), but this gallery is actually about the Garden of the Gods.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Although Colorado has amazing scenery, Utah gives it more than a run for the money. .

Today, I review a trip we took in 2006 that included Mesa Verde National Monument, Utah’s Arches National Park, back to Colorado’s National Monument, through Independence Pass, and back home.

The original post for these photos is HERE. In this post, I’m sharing the 157 photos from THIS Gallery.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient since I don’t know how fast theyll load.

In the middle of 2006, I was still recuperating from 26 years of automotive-related work (I rejoined the workforce in September of that year), but Melisa had a part-time job at Williams-Sonoma.  Because of her odd hours and erratic work schedule, we didn’t have many travel opportunities.

But then she had a break on her schedule . . . a whole weekend off.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I conclude the Mt. Evans series of photos from June of 2012. Depending on how you count them, Colorado has a few mountains (53 or 58) topping 14,000 feet in elevation (4,270 meters), and a few of them (two) have roads allowing people — people like me — to drive to their summits. Pikes Peak is one of them Fourteeners, and Mount Evans is the other and the subject of this post.

The original post for these photos is HERE, and it’s all about the critters we saw. In this post, I’m sharing the 68 photos from THIS Gallery.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient since I don’t know how fast theyll load.

Pond Damsels – Familiar Bluet

Those Damsels were photographed along the shore of Echo Lake before we got onto the scenic highway. There were many flying around, and while they didn’t stand still for long, they usually came back to the same spot, which made it easier to photograph. By the way, that’s the same behavior as dragonflies, which are also easy to photograph.

They are pretty . . .

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I continue with photos from June of 2012. Depending on how you count them, Colorado has a few mountains (53 or 58) topping 14,000 feet in elevation (4,270 meters), and a few of them (two) have roads allowing people — people like me — to drive to their summits. Pikes Peak is one of them Fourteeners, and Mount Evans is the other and the subject of this post.

The original post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post has the coda “Alpine Flowers”. That’s because there are other posts covering other aspects of our visit. For now, I’m sharing the 57 photos from THIS Gallery. As one might gather from the title, this has to do with flowers . . . Flowers growing in the Alpine Tundra.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient since I don’t know how fast theyll load.

I won’t bother naming all the flowering plants on this gallery since anyone interested can read the blog post or visit the gallery for that information, but here’s some general info . . .

“Alpine” is not specifically referring to the Alps, but rather to the area above the tree line (around 12,000 feet in Colorado. . . until the climate changes). It’s the elevation at which trees have too short a growing season. This may be due to low moisture, too low a temperature, or persistent snowpack. The alpine terrain is known as the tundra.

The photos in this gallery are typical of the growth found in this environment.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I continue with photos from June of 2012. Depending on how you count them, Colorado has a few mountains (53 or 58) topping 14,000 feet in elevation (4,270 meters), and a few of them (two) have roads allowing people — people like me — to drive to their summits. Pikes Peak is one of them Fourteeners, and Mount Evans is the other and the subject of this post.

The original post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post has the coda “Sub-Alpine Flowers”. That’s because there are other posts covering other aspects of our visit. For now, I’m sharing the 54 photos from THIS Gallery. As one might gather from the title, this has to do with flowers . . . Flowers growing below the Alpine Tundra.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient since I don’t know how fast theyll load.

Adjacent to the Mt. Goliath Natural Area mentioned last week, there’s the Dos Chappell Nature Center. From the site:

Once you’ve viewed the exhibits, explore the nearby rock gardens and examine the small wildflowers in bloom behind the nature center. Experience an enchanted forest of old gnarled trees by traveling through the quarter-mile Bristlecone Loop Trail. The building, exhibits, and grounds are the result of a cooperative effort between Denver Botanic Gardens, Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado, and the U.S. Forest Service. 

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I continue with photos from June of 2012. Depending on how you count them, Colorado has a few mountains (53 or 58) topping 14,000 feet in elevation (4,270 meters), and a few of them (two) have roads allowing people — people like me — to drive to their summits. Pikes Peak is one of them Fourteeners, and Mount Evans is the other and the subject of this post.

The original post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post has the coda “The Woods“. That’s because there are other posts covering other aspects of our visit. For now, I’m sharing the 37 photos from THIS Gallery. As one might gather from the title, this has to do with trees . . . trees made of wood.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient since I don’t know how fast theyll load.

Until you get above the tree line (approximately 12,000 feet), there are few places where one can see distant scenery through the trees, but mostly you see trees.

I like trees . . . and I especially like the trunks of trees. I mean, I like leaves, too, but usually only at certain times of the year. Unless they are super-duper-interesting leaves.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I offer photos from June of 2012. Depending on how you count them, Colorado has a few mountains (53 or 58) topping 14,000 feet in elevation (4,270 meters), and a few of them (two) have roads allowing people — people like me — to drive to their summits. Pikes Peak is one of them Fourteeners, and Mount Evans is the other and the subject of this post.

The original post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post has the coda “The Scenery“. That’s because there are other posts covering other aspects of our visit. For now, I’m sharing the 108 photos from THIS Gallery.

Note: some are shared as large files so that interested readers can click and zoom in. Be patient as I don’t know how fast theyll load.

Until you get above the tree line (approximately 12,000 feet), there are few places where one can see scenery through the trees, but mostly you see trees.

Lots of aspens, so it would make for a nice fall color tour . . . but we never returned to it, so that’s an opportunity lost. But, on with the post . . .

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

Once again, as a superfluous reminder, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I offer photos from 2008. Specifically, the Fall of 2008, when we set out on a Colorado (read: aspens) color tour. A long-weekend tour, since we were, at the time, both working.

The post for these photos is HERE. Notice the post is titled “Looking Back“. That’s because I’d previously shared the photos via e-mail (in the days before the blog), and I wasn’t completely happy with my processing (Google Gallery). So, in 2018, I reprocessed them . . . and I think I could do even better now. But, for now, I’m sharing the 138 photos on THIS Gallery as they are.

Here’s the thing about leaving Colorado . . . there are many things we don’t miss, but the scenery isn’t one of them.

In brief, these posts serve to introduce new readers — and reintroduce regular readers — to photos from the early days of this blog and, occasionally, to photos from days before this blog came into existence.

As mentioned Sunday, we — Melisa and me — used to live in Colorado, and I took a few photos while we lived there.

Today, I offer two short galleries of photos from Colorado. The first is documented in THIS post, and it’s from July 2005. It coincided with the first visitors we had after moving there. As is our wont, we went on a drive.

Here’s the thing . . . it may not seem like it, but 2005 was a long time ago when it comes to my photography. I snapped 32 photos, of which 27 are included in the SmugMug Gallery (HERE).