Twenty-three visitors viewed the 1500 words challenge post but only two voted. I mean, I get it; it was a holiday. An eating holiday, at that. In retrospect, that wasn’t what one might call good timing. Same for today; people immersed in a spending frenzy aren’t likely to spend their break reading stories and pondering on the relative merits of the narratives before casting a vote.

Still, them Readers Awards won’t mean much if there are no actual readers voting. So, if you can muster the physical and mental energy for it, please read the short stories and cast your vote before noon, December 4th. 

At 1,500 words, reading each story should take no more than seven minutes to read and I realize that’s a huge time commitment in these days of near-instant gratification.

And that’s enough of that . . .

Today’s post is about an old hawk. Not age-wise old; photo old, as in 2012. This was a rare capture for me; a hawk who dropped from above onto a random spot in the snow. I missed the actual moment, but I have the aftermath . . .

So, the first was this:

You can click on the photo and see a larger version (~2x) or you can click HERE and get the full-size panorama photo (five photos stitched together) of this WW II B-17G, the Aluminum Overcast. Only click if you have the bandwidth and fast enough connection to download an 8MB file.  After you have it, you can click on the photo to see it at the 1:1 ratio.

For them not interested in reading, you can go directly to the SmugMug Gallery HERE.  

For a SmugMug slideshow click HERE. When you click the link, it will open in a new window and you have two options:
1) Manually scroll through the photos by clicking the “<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos.
2) There’s a PLAY/PAUSE button at the bottom-left of the screen with the transition set at about 5 seconds. Note: clicking the PLAY arrow will run a full-screen slideshow. You can then still use the”<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos as this will pause the slideshow.

If you want the full experience, keep reading.

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Every so often, I Google myself. 

It’s nothing to do with vanity; it’s a good way to monitor if anyone is using your name (identity) and to ensure all the accounts you have are still under your control. 

Well, one of the listings that came up had me curious . . . so I clicked on THIS link. 

Well, hello there! I know you!

Alaska Cruise 2012

Before we get started, a bit of information. I’ll be posting my own photos but — whenever possible — the text will include a link to the Museum’s own description for the plane in question. Also whenever possible, I’ll include an additional link (usually, from Wikipedia).

It’s just as expedient — if so inclined — going to the Museum’s own website and browsing their collection. This post is mostly for me since I went to the trouble of taking and processing the photos. 

For them not interested in reading, you can go directly to the SmugMug Gallery HERE. All the planes are identified and a link provided to the Museum’s listing. 

For a slideshow click HERE. When you click the link, it will open in a new window. There’s a PLAY/PAUSE button at the bottom-left of the screen with the transition set at about 5 seconds OR you can manually control the transition by clicking on the < and > symbols to the left or right of the photo. Note: hitting the PLAY arrow will run a full-screen slideshow. You can then still use the  < and > keys to navigate the photos as this will pause the slideshow. Full screen gives you a better experience (in my opinion).

If you rather, you can continue from where we left off in Part 3 by scrolling through the rest of the post. For them interested, the links to Part 1 and Part 2.

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Before we get started, a bit of information. I’ll be posting my own photos but — whenever possible — the text will include a link to the Museum’s own description for the plane in question. Also whenever possible, I’ll include an additional link (usually, from Wikipedia).

Yes, it’s just as expedient — if so inclined — going to the Museum’s own website and browsing their collection. This post is mostly for me since I went to the trouble of taking and processing the photos. 

For them not interested in reading, you can go directly to the SmugMug Gallery HERE. All the planes are identified and a link provided to the Museum’s listing. 

For a slideshow click HERE. When you click the link, it will open in a new window. There’s a PLAY/PAUSE button at the bottom-left of the screen with the transition set at about 5 seconds OR you can manually control the transition by clicking on the < and > symbols to the left or right of the photo. Note: hitting the PLAY arrow will run a full-screen slideshow. You can then still use the  < and > keys to navigate the photos as this will pause the slideshow. Full screen gives you a better experience (in my opinion).

If you rather, you can continue from where we left off in Part 2 by scrolling through the rest of the post. For them interested, the link to Part 1.

~0~0~0~

Before we get started, a bit of information. I’ll be posting my own photos but — whenever possible — the photo caption will have a link to the Museum’s own description for the plane in question. Also whenever possible, I’ll include an additional link (usually, from Wikipedia).

Yes, it’s just as expedient — if so inclined — going to the Museum’s own website and browsing their collection. This post is mostly for me since I went to the trouble of taking and processing the photos. 

Continuing where we left off in Part 1, we look at the Zero. I thought it was a more elegant plane than most from that era. 

National Naval Aviation Museum — Mitsubishi A6M2 Zero
National Naval Aviation Museum

For them who won’t read the sign, this Zero is built from parts of crashed Zero fighters found in the late 1960s . . . a Frankenstein Zero. Here’s another look . . . 

I have 386 photos to share and while I toyed with the idea of doing it all in one lo-o-ong post, I’ll instead break it up into multiple posts. 

These are the pared-down versions of over 800 photos I shot over the course of two visits to the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida. The photos are from 2014 and that gives you an idea of just how lazy I can be when processing photos. Fair warning: I’m presenting the planes as displayed four years ago. There might have been additions to the collection, some might have been moved, and some removed to make room for other planes.

Naval Aviation Museum — F-14A Tomcat

Before we get started, a bit of information. I’ll be posting my own photos but — whenever possible — the photo caption will have a link to the Museum’s own description for the plane in question. Also whenever possible, I’ll include an additional link. For instance, for the above plane, I’m including a link to the Wikipedia page for the Grumman F-14 Tomcat.

There are many other links I could have picked but I’ll leave it to the reader to hunt them down (do a Google search). Hint: I’ll often pick the Wikipedia entry because they typically have many links included as references for their articles. 

Yes, it’s just as expedient — if so inclined — going to the Museum’s own website and browsing their collection. This post is mostly for me since I went to the trouble of taking and processing the photos.