I’m I was on a 186-day streak . . . meaning I’d posted at least one post per day for 186 days. It’s not my longest effort, but it’s still significant.

Again, a lot of the posts had to do with The Alphabet Challenge. Still, 2020 saw me put up 414 posts . . . which had an average of 7 comments per post (2,809 total comments, although at least half of those are mine since I answer every comment).

I’ll explain the monochrome part in a moment.

The Alphabet Challenge “R” Stories voting round is off to a slow start, and that’s understandable . . . to everyone but us writers.

OK, that’s a joke. I shouldn’t have to explain that, but these days it’s best to make things perfectly clear; I’m kidding.

I know our regular readers likely will get around to reading and voting, and we writers want you to know we are thankful for each and every one of you. Oh, yeah . . . also the irregular readers who stop by and contribute to the voting.

If you are a reader of our stories and someone who votes, thank you in advance for casting a vote for your favorite of the three. Links to the stories and the poll for voting for “Alphabet Challenge R-Stories” are HERE.<<<Link Votes will be accepted until noon on October 20th.

Believe it or not, I’m using the Classic Block editor as opposed to the Classic Editor to compose this post.

Wanna know why? Because in the course of writing the guide to the Classic Block, I got used to it and it’s not functionally different from the Classic Editor (except for how I insert photos).

Speaking of photos . . .

Seagull walking along the beachYes, that’s a seagull out for a stroll on a Michigan beach (that’s Lake Michigan in the background).

The Alphabet Challenge “P” Stories are up and running and the writers hope many readers are eagerly consuming these fine offerings and jumping at the chance to vote in this round.

If you are one such reader, and if you’ve not already done so — please read the stories and then cast a vote for your favorite of the three. Links to the stories and the poll for voting for “Alphabet Challenge P-Stories” are HERE.<<<Link

A quick note: workers in my neighbor’s yard damaged or cut the Mediacom Cable that provides me with Internet service. Meaning, I’m without high-speed internet.

“How are you posting this, oh great and powerful Disperser?”

Well, I have my phone tethered to my PC. Meaning, I’m using my phone to provide internet to my PC via a USB connection. We’re also using the phones as a hotspot and connect devices to them as we would to Wi-Fi provided through a Router.

This functionality is built-in on most phones (at least Android phones running Verizon). The speed is not something to brag about (100 times slower than my regular Internet) but you know what? I can still upload photos and author posts, read other people’s blogs and even watch YouTube videos. Melisa has the Kindle Fire connected to her phone via wi-Fi and she’s streaming Netflix.

In other words, perfectly usable. Anyway, here are some Hawaiʻian flowers . . . and in a twist, I’m posting the Monochrome versions before I do the color versions.

And, yes, these have been treated with Topaz Impression 2.0  . . .

Reading the Alphabet Challenge “N” Stories is not a black and white matter . . . but monochrome versions of the Virginian Tiger Moth are nearly so (they also have gray).

I just realized the deadline for closing the vote is nearing (Sunday, noon) and I’ve yet to start on my “O” story (and no, I’m not planning on a riff on The Story of O<<link). I mean, the reasearch alone could take years.

Readers, on the other hand, if they’ve not already done so — could read the stories in about a half-hour, and then cast a vote for their favorite of the three. Links to the stories and the poll for voting for “Alphabet Challenge N-Stories” are HERE.<<<Link

So, Virginian Tiger Moth<<link was showcased yesterday . . .

A number of long-time readers aren’t partial to monochrome (and some prefer it) but in this case, monochrome seems to bring out more of the details without blowing other details away . . .

The previous Juneau 2017 post is HERE.<<link

That post has color photos and rather than mix color and monochrome photos, I decided to duplicate the post with the monochrome versions of the photos. Think of it as a nod to the days before color was invented . . .

This is the first (monochrome) post documenting our September 13, 2017, visit to Juneau, Alaska, a now even longer-delayed continuation of my documentation of our 2017 Alaska Cruise. Current and previous posts relating to this cruise are HERE<<link. The following introduction is the same as that of previous posts so that’s something else you can skip.

There’s a gallery at the end of each post and a SmugMug gallery HERE<<link. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery will eventually contain all the (monochrome) photos from Juneau; those from this (monochrome) post (Part 1) and those from subsequent Juneau posts.

You can click on the photos in the body of this post to see a larger-but-less-than-full-size-version. If there’s a panorama, I’ll link the full-size files but be warned . . . they’re typically huge. Huger than people have ever seen before. Don’t click on those links unless you’re enjoying a biggly Interweb connection. Also, if you have biggly Interweb but you’re reading this on a phone — which is sad; VERY SAD — I wouldn’t bother with the full-size photos because they are HUGE; huger than anyone else’s huge photos. 

Youse read that correctly. This is not the last reminder to vote on “C” stories. It might have been clearer had I used penultimate . . . but I try to eschew arcane and brobdingnagian words when lesser words will do.

Anyway, I suspect them who had any intention of reading and then voting for their favorite story have already done so, but just in case, you can vote for them HERE as well as find links to the stories so that — you know — you can read them before you vote.

Right, done with that. Now, about trees . . . rather, one tree, but many photos of it.

Click for a larger version to open in a new tab or window.

Good news for them getting tired of these reminders — the nineteen who voted; this is the last reminder before the January 1 deadline for castig your vote for the best Christmas Short Story Challenge submissions for them who’ve yet to vote. I’m calling on the 1,573 non-voting followers of this blog to step up.

Meanwhile a few photos, including some from our January 2019 Panama crossing cruise.

The next photo is from when the bridge was in front of us.

Good news for them getting tired of these reminders — the twelve who voted; don’t despair; there are only two more days before the January 1 deadline to cast your vote for the best Christmas Short Story Challenge submissions. Besides, this is mostly a reminder for the 1,551 other followers of this blog who have yet to cast a vote.

I mean, it seems pretty straightforward; read the stories, pick the one you like, click the circle next to its name in the short poll, sit back and bask in the glow of satisfaction that comes from participating in such an important . . . ok, ok . . . there is no glow of satisfaction. Look at it like this; you get the chance to annoy two of three writers.

Anyway, to lure suckers . . . er . . . to lure esteemed readers to this post, I need to put up a few photos.

Everyone has seen sea horses, right?

My third reminder for readers  — if they are so inclined and have not already done so — to vote. In this case, vote for one of the Christmas Short Story Challenge submissions. The poll is at the end of that post and we hope to surpass the ten total votes we had for the previous challenge.

Continuing where the last post left off, here are more photos from September of this year when I watched clouds morph into interesting patterns as a front passed over the area.

The workflow for the processing of the images includes a combination of DxO PhotoLab and the Nik Collection with the occasional tweak in Lightroom.

My second reminder for readers  — if they are so inclined and have not already done so — to vote. In this case, vote for one of the Christmas Short Story Challenge submissions. The poll is at the end of that post and we hope to surpass the ten total votes we had for the previous challenge.

Continuing where the last post left off, here are more photos from September of this year when I watched clouds morph into interesting patterns as a front passed over the area.

The workflow for the processing of the images includes a combination of DxO PhotoLab and the Nik Collection with the occasional tweak in Lightroom.

Yes, another series of posts reminding readers to — if they are so inclined — vote. In this case, vote for one of the Christmas Short Story Challenge submissions. The poll is at the end of that post and we hope to surpass the ten total votes we had for the previous challenge.

OK, on to clouds in the sky . . . some might remember THIS post where I showed a few photos I snapped as I watched interesting cloud formations pass over me. That post was my first foray into the Luminar 3 software. I’ve since upgraded to Luminar 4 . . . but that’s not what I used for the photos below.

Nothing against Luminar 4; I just felt like playing with DxO PhotoLab and the Nik Collection. Well, one thing . . . Luminar 4 loads really slow and then, when working with it, one isn’t sure if it’s doing something or if it went to sleep. I like the output from the program but it needs to address some bugs, preferably sooner rather than later.

Anyway, the following images are a combination of DxO PhotoLab and the Nik Collection processing with the occasional tweak in Lightroom.

For them not interested in reading, you can see the photos in THIS SmugMug Gallery.  

For a SmugMug slideshow click HERE. When you click the link, it will open in a new window and you have two options:
1) Manually scroll through the photos by clicking the “<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos.
2) There’s a PLAY/PAUSE button at the bottom-left of the screen with the transition set at about 5 seconds. Note: clicking the PLAY arrow will run a full-screen slideshow. You can then still use the”<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos as this will pause the slideshow.

If you want the full experience, keep reading. BTW, you can click on photos for a larger version.

Forrest Gump got tired of running somewhere below this spot. He turned around and went home.

For them not interested in reading, you can see the photos in THIS SmugMug Gallery.  

For a SmugMug slideshow click HERE. When you click the link, it will open in a new window and you have two options:
1) Manually scroll through the photos by clicking the “<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos.
2) There’s a PLAY/PAUSE button at the bottom-left of the screen with the transition set at about 5 seconds. Note: clicking the PLAY arrow will run a full-screen slideshow. You can then still use the”<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos as this will pause the slideshow.

If you want the full experience, keep reading. BTW, you can click on photos for a larger version.

For them not interested in reading, you can go directly to the SmugMug Gallery HERE.  

For a SmugMug slideshow click HERE. When you click the link, it will open in a new window and you have two options:
1) Manually scroll through the photos by clicking the “<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos.
2) There’s a PLAY/PAUSE button at the bottom-left of the screen with the transition set at about 5 seconds. Note: clicking the PLAY arrow will run a full-screen slideshow. You can then still use the”<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos as this will pause the slideshow.

If you want the full experience, keep reading. You can click on individuals photos to open a larger version in a separate tab or window.

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