On a recent update, Samsung added the capability for Super-slow Motion to the Note 8. Mind you, it’s very limited. By limited, I mean that you can only shoot a few seconds of video and end up with about 6 seconds of slow motion captures.

The problem is that you have to catch whatever you want to film just right . . .

I’m about 18-24 inches away from these guys, for them who want to know.

Because our typical daily driving distance is between four and eight miles with speeds seldom exceeding 35mph, once a week we go for a long drive . . . for the sake of the car; a long drive at higher speeds helps maintain the health of the battery and also burns off deposits which would otherwise accumulate and gum things up. It also doesn’t hurt that there’s a Dairy Queen in Waimea and that we both like their soft-serve cones.  

Yesterday, we drove to Waimea and back via Saddle Road. Here’s the route:

Interestingly, the route looks a bit like a raptor’s talons . . . or the Grinch’s floppy shoe. 

I’m going with talon . . . why does that even matter? Read on.

Do you notice the red circle I drew? The exact coordinates are 19º 51′ 55″ N and 155º 39′ 16″ W.

Well, that’s where we saw this . . . 

Note: this is a long post. If you just want the photos, go to the bottom and check out the gallery sans the witty, incisive, profound, and irreverent banter.

This is the continuation of the posts documenting our September 11, 2017, visit to Glacier Bay National Park. 

The photos below are a mish-mash of various views as we sat at the end of the bay combined with numerous shots as we made our way back toward the next destination — and the subject of the third post (and maybe fourth post) covering Glacier Bay — the John Hopkins Glacier.

These photos may or may not be in chronological order. The timestamp says they are, but some don’t jive with my memory and some don’t seem as if they are in the right sequence. Just so people know, some of the photos have multiple versions and I’ll only include a few in the body of the post. All of the photos will be in the gallery at the end of the post except for the full-size panoramas. I’m also repeating the introduction from Part 1 for them who can’t be bothered to go back and read it and for new visitors who don’t care about the previous set of photos. 

The text in the repeated section is colored in light blue. If you already know the stuff, go to the end of it. 

There is a gallery at the end of this first post and a SmugMug gallery HERE. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery will contain all the photos from Glacier Bay; those from this post (Part 1) will be in there when the post goes live and those of the next post(s) (Part(s) 2(3,4,n+1)) I’ll add as the posts go live.

You can click on the photos in the body of the post to see a larger-but-less-than-full-size-version. A few of the big panoramas will link the full-size files but be warned . . . they are huge. Huger than people have ever seen before. Don’t click on those links unless you’re enjoying a biggly Interweb connection. Also, if you have biggly Interweb but you’re reading this on a phone — which is sad; VERY SAD — I wouldn’t bother with the full-size photos because they are HUGE; huger than anyone else’s huge photos. 

Note: this is a long post. If you just want the photos, go to the bottom and check out the gallery sans the witty, incisive, profound, and irreverent banter.

I have been remiss in documenting the September 2017 Alaska Cruise aboard the Coral Princess. I figure I should repeat the opening of the previous 2017 Alaska Cruise posts, in part because nothing has changed . . . I’m still remiss.

A few congressional investigations and special counsel probes will reveal I am not to blame for this egregious behavior. It’s all lies, I tell you. You see, I’ve actually been doing lots of work on the Alaska Cruise stuff, but that summabirches at WordPress lie about what I’m doing. They insist I’m secretly working on Project 313 — whatever that is. Fake News!   

You want proof? I have me 221 photos ready to post. You heard right; two-hundred-and-twenty-one photos. So many photos — and a few videos — that one post (no matter how biggly) cannot contain them all . . . and (again) that’s for just one day — September 11, 2017.

The Coral’s main gathering place: food, music, shops, and stuff.

There is a gallery at the end of this first post and a SmugMug gallery HERE. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery will contain all the photos from Glacier Bay; those from this post (Part 1) will be in there when the post goes live and those of the next post(s) (Part(s) 2(3,4,n+1)) I’ll add as the posts go live.

You can click on the photos in the body of the post to see a larger-but-less-than-full-size-version. A few of the big panoramas will link the full-size files but be warned . . . they are huge. Huger than people have ever seen before. Don’t click on those links unless you’re enjoying a biggly Interweb connection. Also, if you have biggly Interweb but you’re reading this on a phone — which is sad; VERY SAD — I wouldn’t bother with the full-size photos because they are HUGE; huger than anyone else’s huge photos. 

We begin with a few photos from inside the ship. It’s early morning, the light outside is not that good, there’s fog hiding the scenery, and the air has a definite chill that makes the interior of the ship seem even more inviting than it is. 

So, here we are at Part 2 and we’re facing another dilemma. Should I plan on Part 3 or try and squeeze in 85 more photos and 7 more videos all in this post? 

Well, since I won’t post all the photos, it’s actually only 72 so, sure, let’s do it all in one long post. Plan your snacks and bathroom breaks accordingly. 

As I mentioned at the end of Part 1, the weather was clearing and we were much closer to the glacier; both of those things contributed to give us better photos.

There is a gallery at the end of the post and a SmugMug gallery HERE. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery contains all the photos; those from the previous post (Part 1) and those of this post (Part 2). You can click on these photos to see a larger version but less than full-size. 

As I mentioned in Part 1, there’s a tonal difference in the photos from the D7000 and those of the P900, the latter tending toward a stronger blue hue, probably due to the processing of the camera to produce JPGs as opposed to RAW files.

I have been remiss in documenting the September 2017 Alaska Cruise aboard the Coral Princess

There are many reasons for this egregious lapse in my blogging duties. Not that I’ll share them here, but know there are bigly reasons, all documented in a memo I may or may not release for public consumption.   

Regardless, it’s all good now because here I am; me and a bunch of photos and even videos. So many photos and videos that one post cannot contain them all . . . and that’s for just one day — September 10, 2017.

There is a gallery at the end of the post and a SmugMug gallery HERE. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. Note that the SmugMug gallery contains all the photos; those from this post (Part 1) and those of the next post (Part 2, whenever I post it). You can click on these photos to see a larger version but less than full-size. 

We begin with an early morning view — the photo above — from the Promenade deck. Specifically, the back of the ship. Unfortunately, there isn’t an equivalent front-facing opening at the prow of the ship but regardless of that minor disappointment, the Promenade deck is my favorite deck on the ship.  

Why? Because it’s where one finds the International Café. It’s open 24-hours and it serves coffee, teas, and a variety of snacks. I kid; that’s on Deck 6.

It’s been a while since I got back from the September Alaska cruise — 4,441,924 seconds, give or take the few it takes WordPress to put this up once I hit “publish” — and it’s time I continue with the documentation of the experience. The cruise leg of our trip began with our travel from the Anchorage Airport to the town of Whittier. I covered a bit of that in THIS post, but that was using the photos from the phone (the now-deceased Samsung Note II). This post has a mix of a few phone photos and photos from the P900 and the Nikon D7000.  

There is a gallery at the end of the post and a SmugMug gallery HERE. Photos in SmugMug can be viewed full-size. You can click on these photos to see a larger version but less than full-size. 

We begin with the dogs at the airport. I had a fuzzy photo in previous posts, but here are a couple taken with the D7000.

Beautiful dogs but — according to the owner — prone to biting. I did not test the claim. 

A blog I follow (OneOwner) had a photo of a spinner that looked neat (click on the link to see it). Well, of, course, I had to get one . . . or more. 

Warning: this post will be boring for some — if not all — readers.

One of my two spinners — the colorful one

“What are spinners?” you ask. 

Good question, Bob. The name says it all; they spin. 

“No, I don’t mean what they do; what are they?”

Well, Bob, what they do and what they are are one and the same. I bought me a couple of cheap ones, but you can buy these for some unfsmly amounts of money and all they do is spin. The spin very effortlessly. The above spinner will — with a moderately decent shove — spin for a timed 4 min 28 sec. They have low friction bearings at the center and a weighted periphery of various shapes and colors. Basically, something for the person who likes to fidget . . . or likes to SPIN things. 

Here’s what it looks like spinning . . .