Because the Alphabet Challenge “S” Stories voting round is off to a very slow start, I decided I’d do a few more reminders. I suppose it’s to be expected, what with the Big Scary Day approaching . . . and just a few days before that, Halloween.   

If you are a reader of our stories and someone who votes, thank you in advance for casting a vote for your favorite of the three despite all that’s probably occupying your mind. Links to the stories and the poll for voting for “Alphabet Challenge S-Stories” are HERE.<<<Link Votes will be accepted until noon on November 8th.

I redid the voting post so that it looks more like what it used to look like. Perhaps that was the problem and not the possibility we might suck as writers.

And now, a horse . . .

That’s a photo captured on the first day I owned my Nikon D200.

Anyway, in case no one noticed, the fonts in the blog are different. Until last week, the Adobe toolkit was available to us bloggers . . . specifically, we could set what fonts to use on the title of the blog (above the header photo), what fonts to use for the menu and post titles, and what font to use for the body of the post. Now . . .

For them not interested in reading, you can see the photos in THIS SmugMug Gallery.  

For a SmugMug slideshow click HERE. When you click the link, it will open in a new window and you have two options:
1) Manually scroll through the photos by clicking the “<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos.
2) There’s a PLAY/PAUSE button at the top-left of the screen with the transition set at about 5 seconds. Note: clicking the PLAY arrow will run a full-screen slideshow. You can then still use the”<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos as this will pause the slideshow.

If you want the full experience, keep reading.

So, a few days ago I posted this preview photo:

Here’s how that shot came to be.

The “K” stories voting window will close sometime Tuesday (14 days window). You can wait until then, but to be safe and ensure your vote is counted, you should probably vote for your favorite “Alphabet Challenge K-Stories” HERE<<<This Is A Link by the end of tomorrow (Monday).

Clicking on the above link will take you to the post with the poll where you can cast your vote. The post also contains links to the individual stories. After voting, readers can — if so moved — spread the news about the story to friends and family. Or, not. But, we hope for yes.

So . . . Doe and Fawn . . . we’ve had a doe and fan hanging around the yard last week. We saw them a number of times and I was lucky to see them out my office window.

Unfortunately, I’m shooting with them in the shade and through a window and screen. Still, with a little manipulation, the photos are passable.

Maybe one more voting day left (and I’ve yet to write anything) before the “H” stories voting closes and the “I” stories go live. If leaning toward it, please read the “H” Alphabet Challenge Stories. After, if receptive to the idea, the writers hope you’ll make the effort and vote for your favorite HERE.<<<this is a link

That post has links to the individual stories and the poll where readers can click a box to indicate their appreciation for their favorite.

If you’ve already voted, thank you. If you’ve already forced your friends to read and vote, excellent!

Here’s the bird from yesterday . . . a Ruby-throated Hummingbird:<<<this is a link This is a shot I shared yesterday but I played around in Plotaverse (which won’t show in some devices) . . .

Plotaverse animation

For them not interested in reading, you can see the photos in THIS SmugMug Gallery.  

For a SmugMug slideshow click HERE. When you click the link, it will open in a new window and you have two options:
1) Manually scroll through the photos by clicking the “<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos.
2) There’s a PLAY/PAUSE button at the upper-left of the screen with the transition set at about 5 seconds. Note: clicking the PLAY arrow will run a full-screen slideshow. You can then still use the”<” and “>” symbols to the left or right of the photos as this will pause the slideshow.

If you want the full experience, keep reading.

My third reminder for readers  — if they are so inclined and have not already done so — to vote. In this case, vote for one of the Christmas Short Story Challenge submissions. The poll is at the end of that post and we hope to surpass the ten total votes we had for the previous challenge.

Continuing where the last post left off, here are more photos from September of this year when I watched clouds morph into interesting patterns as a front passed over the area.

The workflow for the processing of the images includes a combination of DxO PhotoLab and the Nik Collection with the occasional tweak in Lightroom.

My second reminder for readers  — if they are so inclined and have not already done so — to vote. In this case, vote for one of the Christmas Short Story Challenge submissions. The poll is at the end of that post and we hope to surpass the ten total votes we had for the previous challenge.

Continuing where the last post left off, here are more photos from September of this year when I watched clouds morph into interesting patterns as a front passed over the area.

The workflow for the processing of the images includes a combination of DxO PhotoLab and the Nik Collection with the occasional tweak in Lightroom.

Yes, another series of posts reminding readers to — if they are so inclined — vote. In this case, vote for one of the Christmas Short Story Challenge submissions. The poll is at the end of that post and we hope to surpass the ten total votes we had for the previous challenge.

OK, on to clouds in the sky . . . some might remember THIS post where I showed a few photos I snapped as I watched interesting cloud formations pass over me. That post was my first foray into the Luminar 3 software. I’ve since upgraded to Luminar 4 . . . but that’s not what I used for the photos below.

Nothing against Luminar 4; I just felt like playing with DxO PhotoLab and the Nik Collection. Well, one thing . . . Luminar 4 loads really slow and then, when working with it, one isn’t sure if it’s doing something or if it went to sleep. I like the output from the program but it needs to address some bugs, preferably sooner rather than later.

Anyway, the following images are a combination of DxO PhotoLab and the Nik Collection processing with the occasional tweak in Lightroom.

I subscribe to KelbyOne for Photoshop and Lightroom tutorials and tips and hints. Every year, they provide freebies to their members for the 12 Days of Christmas. This year, one of them was a year-long membership to PlotaVerse.

For them who don’t know — I didn’t know until today — it’s a site where you can upload a photo and add motion to it.

NOTE: while not huge, these files a tad larger than usual; Give them a few minutes to load if you have slow Internet service.

For instance, I can take this photo . . .

. . . and make it do this . . .

Mind you, I’m still learning the tool and that was my first attempt.

. . . and this was my second attempt . . .

On a recent update, Samsung added the capability for Super-slow Motion to the Note 8. Mind you, it’s very limited. By limited, I mean that you can only shoot a few seconds of video and end up with about 6 seconds of slow motion captures.

The problem is that you have to catch whatever you want to film just right . . .

I’m about 18-24 inches away from these guys, for them who want to know.