Edited to Add: for those of you comfortable with minimal directions, the gallery at the bottom might be all that is needed and you can probably get through it in under five minutes.

This is a long post and composed entirely using the Classic Editor Block in the Block Editor environment.

Yes, the Classic Editor is still available, and yes, people prefer it (including me) . . . BUT . . . this is coming, so I figure I’d do a tutorial.

Using the Classic Editor block is a way to ease into using blocks and while I have a lot of slides, it’s not because it’s difficult. It’s actually super-easy, barely an inconvenience (but some inconvenience).

I think the problem is that people aren’t familiar with what are, frankly, some confusing aspects of working with block.

WARNING: this is a long post, but it’s mostly slides (and there’s a gallery of all the slides at the end).

NOTE: I’m using a PC. I don’t use my phone to compose stuff unless I want to punish myself. If you’re on a phone reading this, you won’t get anything from it because you won’t be able to read the text.

This should be the same for both free and paid blogs (not the .ORG blogs as I don’t have those so I don’t know).

So, here we go . . . begin by going to your dashboard . . . (mostly slides from here on) . . .

For them not interested in reading, you can see the photos in THIS<<link SmugMug Gallery.  If you want the full experience, keep reading.

While we get many hummingbirds in the back yard, we don’t get many butterflies. Almost none, actually.

This is why, when I see the flutter of big wings, I jump into action, the camera on hand. Such was the case some days ago, especially because the butterfly was unusual. I mean, I’ve already said any butterfly would be unusual here, but this one had black wings. A Black Swallowtail<<link, no less.

Now, this first photo isn’t all that great, but I kept it because of the photo-bombing bee . . . 

As usual, click on the photo to open a larger version in a new tab or window.

Actually, most of the shots were frustrating to get because the fluttering beast was obstinately uncooperative. It seldom gave me a full open-wings shot and robbed me of a decent profile shot. 

Here it is again, the bee safely to the side.

A conversation between my sister and diem3 had me remember the photos I snapped of my mother’s cross-stitch projects.

I should clarify . . . in Part 1<<link, I identified her work as needlepoint, but it’s cross-stitch. I corrected that in Part 2<<link, but I repeat it here.

OK, cross-stitch . . . here’s a description (LINK) and here’s a bit of history (LINK) and some stitches (LINK).

The last cross-stitch post had mostly Christmas related projects . . . . not this time . . .

Again, it might be helpful to step back from the screen to appreciate the picture. Up close, you can see the stitches.

A conversation between my sister and diem3 had me remember the photos I snapped of my mother’s cross-stitch projects.

I should clarify . . . in Part 1, I identified her work as needlepoint, but it’s cross-stitch.

OK, cross-stitch . . . here’s a description (LINK) and here’s a bit of history (LINK) and some stitches (LINK).

The pieces I’m posting today are all Christmas related . . . and because I’m pressed for time, I’ll keep my brilliant commentary to a minimum (or completely absent).

Some of these have greetings in Italian; “Auguri” means Greetings . . . whereas Anguria means Watermelon. I know, it’s not relevant, but I wanted to put that out there for them who might be interested.