The next-to-last reminder about “C” stories

Youse read that correctly. This is not the last reminder to vote on “C” stories. It might have been clearer had I used penultimate . . . but I try to eschew arcane and brobdingnagian words when lesser words will do.

Anyway, I suspect them who had any intention of reading and then voting for their favorite story have already done so, but just in case, you can vote for them HERE as well as find links to the stories so that — you know — you can read them before you vote.

Right, done with that. Now, about trees . . . rather, one tree, but many photos of it.

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I drive by this tree every time I visit the Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge.

You can see it on Google Earth . . . both the refuge and the tree. If you happen to use the street view option, you’ll see it with lots of snow on the ground . . . something we didn’t have this winter.

Unfortunately, it looks a lot better in person than in the photos (even my photos) . . . unless I dress it up in B&G&W. . . .

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Nope!

. . . it still looks better in person.

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It’s a big tree, difficult to capture in all its splendor. Plus, it would help if I went there early morning to catch the Eastern light . . . but I got me other things to do in the mornings.

I tried a few different treatments to see if I can really show it off . . .

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Because it’s so big, it’s difficult both capturing the details of it while still showing its impressive sprawl.

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I call that last one my “graveyard B&G&W conversion”. Meaning, headstones look pretty good with that B&G&W treatment.

As far as color, if I want to show details of the tree by zeroing in on a given spot, it changes the lighting and how the photo gets processed . . .

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I really wish someone — someone other than me — would go up there and remove the branch that mars the pattern of the branches. At first, I thought it was a broken branch . . . but no; it just done got grown badly.

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I particularly like the near-white bark. Depending on the light, it really stands out.

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You’ll note I tried different B&G&W conversions. I’m presenting those I thought looked the best, but there are many variations that probably would look just as good.

Here’s what else I did . . . I snapped five photos — each of a different part of the tree — and combined them into a panorama. I was concerned I’d get a lot of ghosting and artifacts from merging the photos, but Photoshop did a pretty good job of it.

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Now, that doesn’t look much different from the first photo . . . but click HERE and you’ll get the full-size version (6,271 x 5,464 pixels, 12 MB). I shouldn’t have to mention it but if you have a dial-up connection, go ahead and skip clicking on the link. Also, perhaps upgrade your internet connection. If you click on it, once the file opens, you can click on the photo to zoom in and out.

You can also see all of the full-size versions of the above photos in THIS SmugMug Gallery.

What? you want to see a couple of B&G&W versions of that last photo? Why sure!

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They aren’t drastically different, but different they are and I liked them both, so here they are.

Here’s the gallery of the Black & Gray & White versions . . .

And for them who prefer a bit of color . . .

I’m fairly sure we’ll see a bit more of this tree, but meanwhile . . .

That’s it. This post has ended . . . except for the stuff below.

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Note: if you are not reading this blog post at DisperserTracks.com, know that it’s copied without permission, and likely is being used by someone with nefarious intentions, like attracting you to a malware-infested website.  Could be they also torture small mammals.

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About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Black & White, DxO Software, Nikon D7500, Photo Post-processing, Photography Stuff, Photos and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to The next-to-last reminder about “C” stories

  1. AnnMarie says:

    First, thanks for the BIG word!

    Second, thanks for the BIG tree! It’s really a wonderful looking tree . . . even down to the ‘grown badly’ branch. It looks majestic both in color and not!

    Like

  2. According to Google, “Brobdingnagian” should always be capitalized. But I’m sure you are forgiven!

    Like

    • disperser says:

      I wasn’t aware I needed forgiveness, especially from Google . . . My spellchecker kept capitalizing it, but I specifically wanted it lower-case, and Google-be-damned (and unforgiven).

      My argument is that it’s not referring to something from Brobdingnag. It’s a modifier expressing a quality (in this case, of words) and I don’t capitalize modifiers.

      Now, in English, you’re told to capitalize proper adjectives (adjectives deriving from proper nouns). Under that rule, Google is correct . . . but, ask it why we don’t capitalize venetian blinds, french fries, china (as in plates), or other proper names. I mean, some people capitalize them but it can be — and is — argued they do so incorrectly.

      Lastly, rules of grammar are derived by usage; there is no authority per se other than self-declared ones, and even then, primarily for formal writing. This is evident by the loosely described rule that the capitalization is lost when something becomes a common term (as in french fries or china). But, who decides? And when do “they” decide?

      How can it be that something is wrong until it’s suddenly agreed that it’s not? My argument (like for slavery, burning witches, and eating broccoli) is that it was always wrong.

      I be choose a rebel to I be in many things, including this, and someday, vindicated I will be . . . but not unless brobdingnagian becomes a common term and we stop capitalizing stuff all willy-nilly.

      Like

  3. Your photos of that impressive tree are impressive! A joy to look at each of them!
    I had to look up brobdingnagian…thanks for helping me learn a new word. I shall seek opportunities to use it in my speaking today.
    HUGS!!! :-)
    PS…Sometimes the number of words I say in a day is brobdingnagian. HA!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. you certainly have provided a good set here of the lone tree. Dramatic and I especially love the monochrome!

    Like

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