Got me more hummers videos

hummingbirds are very distracting, I tell you what.

Take, for instance, yesterday evening. I wanted to work on a few things but I kept hearing them . . . humming.

. . . so I went out with my phone . . .

I’m about two feet away. The trick is to not make any sudden movements. Also, I’ve learned — or think I’ve learned — they react much more to eye movement than to other small movements. That’s why I either wear sunglasses or keep the phone between them and my eyes.

There’s a problem with keeping the phone too close . . . sometimes I don’t notice the shot isn’t in focus.

Still, I captured some decent slow-motion shots. These are “regular” slow motion (1/8 speed). Samsung “improved” the video editing software to where it’s now near impossible getting a clip of what I want from a longer video so I had to jump a few hoops to get these next three clips the way I wanted them.

This first video is about a minute long and includes the visual treat of watching a hummingbird crap in slow motion . . .

This next video is one minute and twenty seconds long and shows the interaction between hummingbirds.

This next video is two minutes and there’s a short “dead zone” in the middle that I could not clip out. Maybe someday I’ll invest the money and time on a decent editor.

I could have stood out there much longer but a mosquito came near and bit me while I was filming. I figured it was time to head back in because where there’s one mosquito there are many.

Today, I kept inside . . . but saw things like the scene in the following twenty seconds video. It’s not a great video because it’s shot through glass and a screen, but it gives you an idea.

That’s quite the sight . . . five birds on one feeder. I’m guessing they were exhausted from chasing each other and had to take a break and refuel. Mind you, these scenes don’t last long.

Here’s another thing that was happening all afternoon. Watch the whole thing.

. . . to think I was concerned about attracting hummers . . .

That’s it. This post has ended . . . except for the stuff below.

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