National Museum of Naval Aviation — Part 2

Before we get started, a bit of information. I’ll be posting my own photos but — whenever possible — the photo caption will have a link to the Museum’s own description for the plane in question. Also whenever possible, I’ll include an additional link (usually, from Wikipedia).

Yes, it’s just as expedient — if so inclined — going to the Museum’s own website and browsing their collection. This post is mostly for me since I went to the trouble of taking and processing the photos. 

Continuing where we left off in Part 1, we look at the Zero. I thought it was a more elegant plane than most from that era. 

National Naval Aviation Museum — Mitsubishi A6M2 Zero

National Naval Aviation Museum

For them who won’t read the sign, this Zero is built from parts of crashed Zero fighters found in the late 1960s . . . a Frankenstein Zero. Here’s another look . . . 

National Naval Aviation Museum

Can you see the bolts holding it together?

Right next to the zero, we find the F4F-3A Wildcat, one of the Zero’s foes. 

National Naval Aviation Museum — Grumman F4F-3A Wildcat

National Naval Aviation Museum

Next up, We have the Douglas A1-Skyraider (formerly, AD).

National Naval Aviation Museum — Douglas A-1H (AD) Skyraider

The interesting thing — or, what I found interesting — is this plane could carry a heavier bomb payload than the B-17 Flying Fortress

National Naval Aviation Museum — Douglas A-1H (AD) Skyraider

Next up, another plane with pleasing lines . . . or, I’m just partial to external tanks. The McDonnell F2H Banshee served as a reconnaissance platform during the Korean War.

National Naval Aviation Museum — McDonnell F2H-2P Photo Banshee

I have to admit to having a different impression of the nature of a banshee. I thought it a monster of some kind. I mean, technically, yes, that’s what it is, but I thought it more the malevolent monster. I mean, yes, malevolent, but more in a physical way. Oh, heck, I’m not sure what I thought. I guess not knowing something lets you formulate a vague placeholder for something. A placeholder lacking any clarity or accuracy. 

National Naval Aviation Museum — F2H-2P Photo Banshee

Here’s one more view of it . . . 

National Naval Aviation Museum — F2H-2P Photo Banshee

I presume those are cameras sitting in front of the plane. Honestly, when I’m snapping photos I seldom read the information; I’m more focused on lines and composition. I usually recognize the planes I know and those I don’t know I scope out for interesting angles and compositions. 

For them not clicking on the links . . .
“The Museum’s F2H-2P Banshee spent the years between 1959 and 1988 with its fuselage filled with cement sitting in {the} sand in a playground in Vero Beach, Florida, where children pretended to soar among the clouds in its cockpit. Accessioned by the Museum in 1989, it is restored in the markings of Bureau Number 126673, a VMJ-1 aircraft of the Korean War.”

We now come to a happy-looking plane despite some calling it “four-eyes”. 

National Naval Aviation Museum — Messerschmitt Me 262

You have to admit it presents a definite happy-go-lucky-goofy visage. 

National Naval Aviation Museum — Messerschmitt Me 262

National Naval Aviation Museum — Messerschmitt Me 262

I thought the Messerschmitt Me 262 was the plane with the vertical-shooting guns triggered by photocells, but that’s actually the Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet. They don’t have one in this museum . . . come to think of it, I’m not sure what this plane is doing here as I don’t think it was deployed by the German Navy. 

National Naval Aviation Museum — Me 262

Before I go on to other planes, a few more photos from this area. 

National Naval Aviation Museum — Douglas A-1H Skyraider

National Naval Aviation Museum — Douglas A-1H Skyraider

National Naval Aviation Museum — F2H-2P Photo Banshee

Occasionally, I zoomed out and took in what I call atmosphere shots. Shots that give you a flavor for what it’s like at the expanse of jumbled landing gears, propellers, wings . . . wait . . . what’s that?

National Naval Aviation Museum

Why, that looks like the TV-2 (T-33B) Shooting Star. The TV-2 is a variant of the Lockheed T-33.

National Naval Aviation Museum — Lockheed TV-2 (T-33B) Shooting Star

It’s a long plane and there wasn’t a great angle from which to photograph it without something else being in the way. I took this shot because it shows the rear of the Shooting Star but also the Me 262 and the Catalina hanging from the ceiling. 

National Naval Aviation Museum

Here’s the front view of the Shooting Star. 

National Naval Aviation Museum — Lockheed TV-2 (T-33B) Shooting Star

National Naval Aviation Museum — Lockheed TV-2 (T-33B) Shooting Star

It’s amazing how different planes look when viewed from different angles. For instance . . . 

National Naval Aviation Museum — McDonnell FH-1 Phantom

That’s the McDonnell FH-1 Phantom and it looks different when looking at it at an angle.

National Naval Aviation Museum — McDonnell FH-1 Phantom

Here’s the plaque describing the plane. 

National Naval Aviation Museum

Occasionally, it pays to look up . . . 

National Naval Aviation Museum — HUP-3 Retriever

National Naval Aviation Museum

The Piasecki HUP Retriever was a utility/rescue aircraft. There were 30 HUP-3 versions built. 

Next up . . . er . . . on the floor, we have the Grumman AF-2S Guardian.

National Naval Aviation Museum — Grumman AF-2S Guardian

National Naval Aviation Museum

National Naval Aviation Museum — Grumman AF-2S Guardian

In fleet service, a pair of Guardians operated together forming submarine hunter-killer teams that were a mainstay into the mid-1950s.

Early in the war, Japanese Aviators were experienced and battle-hardened.  By the end of the war, attrition resulted in aviators with less experience . . . probably a good thing for US Aviators. 

National Naval Aviation Museum

Interesting they are shown carrying swords. I don’t know if they had the swords with then in the plane, but I can imagine that being the case.

Next up, we have “George”.

Japanese airplanes were given common names and George was the designation of the Kawanishi N1K2-J Shiden-Kai which proved to be one of the best dogfighting aircraft produced by either side.

National Naval Aviation Museum — Kawanishi N1K2 Shiden-Kai (George)

National Naval Aviation Museum — Kawanishi N1K2 Shiden-Kai (George)

National Naval Aviation Museum — Kawanishi N1K2 Shiden-Kai (George)

National Naval Aviation Museum — Kawanishi N1K2 Shiden-Kai (George)

National Naval Aviation Museum — Kawanishi N1K2 Shiden-Kai (George)

I think this is a good place to cut off this second post. 

Here’s the gallery of the above photos. To see the photos in their original size or presented a bit better, please visit the associated SmugMug Gallery HERE.

That’s it. This post has ended . . . except for the stuff below.

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About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
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11 Responses to National Museum of Naval Aviation — Part 2

  1. Thanks for sharing this, Emilio! I enjoy seeing the aircraft/planes in your great photos AND I enjoy learning about them!

    No big surprise…I love the Smiley Face Plane bestest! :-)

    Oh! BTW, recently I learned about the “airplane boneyard” (Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group). Quite interesting!

    HUGS!!! :-)
    PS…I enjoy your car and train photos, too!

    Like

  2. macquie says:

    Thank you for another share of photos at Aviation Museum. This post is enough to urge me to visit and see by myself. Those war planes always reminded me of old documentary films about TOKKO special force who took off for their suicide mission, and I had not really took a chance to see them from aeromechanic perspectives. As the museum looks like restored ZERO perfectly, I will need to make a visit one day.
    Oh,..as for sword the pilot held, there was no clear statement as to whether it was included as one of pilot uniform, but I feel it was held as a symbol for for Japanese pride or dignity that they must have had from SAMURAI spirit.

    Like

  3. Fascinating.
    I wonder why there are no British aircraft there, could it be………….

    Like

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