Project 313 – Post No. 075

On the face of it, most people don’t like change. This isn’t a scientific statement; it’s just my impression.

I’m sure one can find articles arguing for or against that view but my experience is that people don’t like change. 

I’m ambivalent about change. There are a lot of things I would like to see changed. I also don’t mind things changing when the change is for the better. However, my experiences made me wary of change and, as a general rule, I’m pessimistic of it.  

Meaning, I’ve seldom experienced change strictly for the better. Something might be “improved” to fix one problem but in the course of “fixing” something, two or three new problems are introduced. Moreover, I get a sense of dread when something is changed for the specific purpose of “improving” it. 

As previously mentioned, software companies are some of the worst offenders . . .

. . . next to people who constantly fiddle with the look of their blogs. Funny that some of the people who complain about change are also them who are most likely to keep changing stuff. 

I kid, but there are large grains of truth in what I say. 

Here’s why I don’t like change just for change sake . . . it requires effort on my part. If a blog I read changes their layout, I now have to pay attention not to the content, but to the peripheral stuff that has no value-added for me.

I mean, I understand a blog can in itself be an expression of the personality of the person offering it up. But, seriously, do people’s personalities change that frequently? 

One aspect of human nature is that we like the familiar. We don’t want the menu at our favorite restaurant to change every week. For that matter, we don’t like the decor of our favorite restaurant changing every other month. 

When change is forced upon us, we often refer back to “what we were used to” in a “woe is me” tone as if we’ve lost something of value. Which, in a way, we did.  

It’s weird that as much as humans resist change, our whole economy and way of life is geared toward change. Everything is always improving whether we want it to or not. Again, most of it is not actual improvement. 

Cars used to work just fine and while we can point to many safety improvements, other improvements are nothing but adding to the probability of costly repairs and reducing the longevity of the product. And that’s in addition to me not needing half the features “included” in the now more expensive product. 

But, fear not, dear readers . . . eight years and counting and this blog still sports the same theme it started with.

And now, the photo:

Project 313 075

I think I will like this series. I mean the series of automotive macros. I’ll start mixing in regular photos after a bit but, for now, I’m reveling in creative experimentation. 

Speaking of change, I did make one change. I changed the signature on the photos. In case anyone is wondering, that’s not my handwriting. It’s one of the many fonts loaded in my machine. 

I wanted to add the Disperser moniker but wasn’t happy with my printing or cursive so I switched to something that looks handwritten but isn’t. 

That’s an example of a change that affects no one. No one really looks at the watermark so the change is strictly for my pleasure. I imagine most people wouldn’t even have noticed had I not drawn attention to it. 

I like this cartoon . . . 

Ignoring the joke part, I wouldn’t mind being able to speak five or six languages. By speak, I mean able to communicate with someone who speaks one of those languages. I don’t need to be fluent enough to write articles in that language; I just want to be able to communicate with people. 

Of course, some people are awfully picky and tedious about their language and go out of their way to not understand. I experience that in Germany and Switzerland. Here, I’ve seen similar treatment of people who have accents . . . they can easily be understood, but some people just plain don’t like accents. They think them un-American . . . forgetting their own ancestors probably spoke little or no English, especially if they came from England. 

There are many dead languages and that’s worth remembering. If a language doesn’t grow with the needs of the people using it, it will eventually be replaced.

When I draw my doodles, I seldom have anything specific in mind . . . certainly not an Aztechenian Fantasy. And, yes, I prefer that made-up spelling to the actual (some would say “correct”) spelling. 

Aztechenian Fantasy

And . . . that’s it

Some of these posts will likely be longer as the mood hits me, but most will be thus; short, uninteresting, bland, and relentless.

You can read about Project 313 HERE.

That’s it. This post has ended . . . except for the stuff below.

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Note: if you are not reading this blog post at DisperserTracks.com, know that it has been copied without permission, and likely is being used by someone with nefarious intention, like attracting you to a malware-infested website.  Could be they also torture small mammals.

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Please, if you are considering bestowing me recognition beyond commenting below, refrain from doing so.  I will decline blogger-to-blogger awards.   I appreciate the intent behind it, but I prefer a comment thanking me for turning you away from a life of crime, religion, or making you a better person in some other way.  That would mean something to me.

If you wish to know more, please read below.

About awards: Blogger Awards
About “likes”:   Of “Likes”, Subscriptions, and Stuff

Note: to those who may click on “like”, or rate the post; if you do not hear from me, know that I am sincerely appreciative, and I thank you for noticing what I do.

. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.

Finally, if you interpret anything on this blog as me asking or wanting pity, sympathy, or complaining about my life, or asking for help and advice, know you’re likely missing my subtle mix of irony, sarcasm, and humor.

About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
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17 Responses to Project 313 – Post No. 075

  1. oneowner says:

    I like to change my socks every day. It’s really not so much that I like to change them. It’s more like I need to. Otherwise, yeah.

    Like

  2. Nostalgia isn’t what it used to be!

    Like

  3. Pied Type says:

    I agree with you about change. It’s often annoying, unnecessary, and not better — just different. Mostly I think I don’t like it because it usually means I have to change — my thinking, my way of doing things, my habits.

    I had a Nova once. ’72 as I recall. Same copper color as in your picture.

    “Aztechian” is long enough for me. The “tech” part is clever, and they certainly earned it. Nice doodle, btw.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. disperser says:

    Well, it should be “Aztec” as the word doesn’t need a suffix but I like making up words.

    That Nova was line green . . . I played with the photo a bit.

    Like

  5. I’m not a fan of change UNTIL it’s a change I like! Ha!

    PHOTO: I dated a guy in high school who had an old Nova, but he didn’t use Avon.
    CARTOON: HA! Gotta’ love Willy!
    DOODLE: Perfect name for a beautiful doodle!
    HUGS!!! :-)

    Like

  6. Well that’s a relief, I was wondering what a Nova was, the only Nova’s I’d heard about were usually prefixed Super.
    So it was a motor vehicle of sorts made by who? Cadillac?

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Chevrolet. Also, PBS, but that’s a different vehicle.

      Like

      • PBS sounds more like a radio or TV station.
        American cars have not been seen very much in Australia since the Japanese invasion, Would you believe even our police and taxi’s are now Toyota?
        The last American cars assembled here CKU/CKD were the Nash Ramblers, back in 1964 at the AMI plant in Fishermans Bend Melbourne. I was working there at that time

        Like

      • disperser says:

        Say, you’re brighter than you sound. It’s actually a Television Network.

        Also, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holden

        I think American cars have been there (and might yet be there) but disguised as something else. That’s manufactured cars. I think Holden was supposed to close in 2017 and I don’t know if they did. Even so, actual American cars (and other makes) are imported there and make up about 2-3% of the car volume.

        Some of the cars that were sold here were actually manufactured in Australia in the early part of this century. I don’t remember the exact year – in the early 2000s I briefly considered emigrating to Australia and working for the Auto industry over there but it looked in decline.

        The Japanese invasion occurred primarily because of changing trade treaties and continues to this day. I don’t anticipate it changing . . . unless it becomes a Chinese invasion.

        Like

  7. AnnMarie says:

    We only have great memories of our two Nova’s. And NOVA is one of my favorite PBS shows!

    Liked by 1 person

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