The June 2015 Night Sky – Part I

This paragraph is here because otherwise this poor excuse for an editor continuously loses the setting for opening the photos in a separate window or tab. Aggravating that, and I still don’t see why I can’t have that as a general option (as it used to be), but instead have to set it for each photo . . . three times now.
20150619_210217_HDR-Processed_DIGI

That is a photo of yesterday evening’s planetary-moon alignment as taken with my phone and shared via e-mail.

Some might recall this video I shared earlier this week:

Of course, I did not just use the phone. I also got my trusty D7000 and proceeded to shoot the scene using both my Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 and Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 lenses. 

There is a SmugMug gallery of all the photos HERE. I plan to take more photos between now and the end of the month, and they will be added to that gallery.

There are currently thirty (30) photos in the gallery, but really, there are only 10, with each photo shown in three versions: full color, partial color, and B&W. I’m not going to show all of them here, but if you see a photo in one format and wonder what it looks like in another, go to the gallery.

Here is the first photo, taken as soon as some clouds moved and I could clearly see all three objects.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

I say this for all my posts, but I’ll repeat it here because some people might not be able to see Jupiter in the smaller format; you can click on the photo to open it in a new tab or window. If you do, you’ll get a version twice as large as the above.

By the way, this is what the same photo looks like in partial color . . . 

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

. . . and the B&W processing I used for all the photos.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

For the rest of the photos, I’ll choose only one version.

The landscape version allowed me to frame all of them while zooming in . . . but it’s not very interesting. Portrait orientation lends itself better for presenting the scene as I witnessed it.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

Again, it was still twilight, and while my eyes easily resolved the individual points of lights, the above zoomed out photograph makes Jupiter difficult to see. 

Zooming in a bit makes the scene easier to resolve.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

These were shot hand-held, and hence only in a few of the photos are the planets clear spheroids of reflected lights. Also, as it got darker, I had to manually set the speed, ISO, and aperture. 

Here’s another photo like the above with different settings.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

Interestingly, if your screen is dusty, you might see more planets than are actually there.

I had two instances of a plane entering the picture. One I missed, but the other gave me these two photos.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

By the time I took these, earthshine was becoming visible, no more than an imagined outline, but there for my eyes to see.

About then it occurred to me that I could both zoom in and get the entire scene if I shot three to five photos and stitched them to create vertical panoramas. All of the following are panoramas from multiple photos.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

Soon, the sunset afterglow faded to a subdued azure . . . but I’m going to show you the B&W version because it clearly shows earthshine and the visage formed by the clouds and planets.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

To me, and I have a vivid imagination, it looks as if the clouds and planets make up a visage of something trying to blow at the crescent moon.

The visage then took on vulpine features and this is a photo that merits being shown both in color and B&W. Note the more pronounced earthshine.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

The last photo is still a vertical panorama but composed of three photos in landscape orientation.

June 2015 Celestial Show

June 2015 Celestial Show

Tonight, if it’s clear, I hope to get the other triangle (watch the video to see what I’m referring to).That’s it. This post has ended . . . except for the stuff below.

That’s it. This post has ended . . . except for the stuff below.

 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o o o o o o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Eye Candy

Eye Candy

Astute persons might have noticed these doodles, and correctly surmised they hold some significance for me, and perhaps for humanity at large.  

If you click on the doodle, and nothing happens, this is the link it’s supposed to go to: https://disperser.wordpress.com/2011/12/26/palm-vx-and-i/.

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Note: if you are not reading this blog post at DisperserTracks.com, know that it has been copied without permission, and likely is being used by someone with nefarious intention, like attracting you to a malware-infested website.  Could be they also torture small mammals.

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Please, if you are considering bestowing me recognition beyond commenting below, refrain from doing so.  I will decline blogger-to-blogger awards.   I appreciate the intent behind it, but I prefer a comment thanking me for turning you away from a life of crime, religion, or making you a better person in some other way.  That would mean something to me.

If you wish to know more, please read below.

About awards: Blogger Awards
About “likes”:   Of “Likes”, Subscriptions, and Stuff

Note: to those who may click on “like”, or rate the post; if you do not hear from me, know that I am sincerely appreciative, and I thank you for noticing what I do.

. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.

About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Black & White, Night Sky, Photography, Photography Stuff, Scenery and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to The June 2015 Night Sky – Part I

  1. mvschulze says:

    Very nice, and a bonus for me, as the weather has not been good here. I saw the NASA clip a week or two ago, (maybe it was from you?) ..an excellent description of the events. Jeanne and I will be on a ship during the days around the Jup/Venus conjunction, but hope to get a few images from there. Looking forward to more from you. M :-)

    Like

  2. oneowner says:

    If Webster is “Where Life is Worth Living”, it’s not because of the weather. We have had quite a bit of rain and overcast skies (not that I mind as a photographer), but there really isn’t much to see at night.

    Like

  3. I was very disappointed I was scrolling through waiting for Zeus to collide with Aphrodite and you stopped. For shame my good man, I was getting all excited! id you not stay for the collision?

    Like

  4. Great captures, Emilio! The nighttime sky is so beautiful this time of year!
    And living at almost 5400 ft, the stars and moon seem so close to me! :-)
    HUGS!!! :-)

    Like

  5. AnnMarie says:

    Though I’m writing this on the 30th of June and have been following the celestial presentation since the middle of the month, I’m still awed at the beauty of the planets and the moon (which now is nearly full). Nicely done, E. And, yes, it does look like the planet/eyes are looking at the moon as the whole thing is blowing at it. Neat!

    Like

    • disperser says:

      I’m missing the finale as we have overcast skies . . . oh well.

      Like

      • AnnMarie says:

        As soon as I got outside the building when I left work at 9:30 CT I looked for the two expecting to see them together as detailed in the video, but what I saw was Jupiter about a quarter inch away and about the 1 o’clock position above Venus. Since we have tall trees by the house we could not see them get any closer. But I would have like to. What I’m wondering is if they were closer earlier than when we looked at them.

        Like

        • disperser says:

          I think they get closer later. If you have a smartphone you can download two apps I recommend. One is SkEye and the other one is Google Sky Map. Both apps allow you to point the phone at the sky and it tells you what’s up there. Actually, you can point to anywhere (at your feet) and it tells you what the sky looks like on the other side of the Earth.

          One program I recommend for the computer is the one mentioned in the original post about the moons of Jupiter: http://www.stellarium.org/
          That let’s you enter a date (any date) and lets you go forward and backwards to see what the sky will look (or looked) in the future (or past).

          Also, there is a site called Heavens Above that has information for observing the space station and satellites (they have an Android app, don’t know about iPhone).

          Like

        • AnnMarie says:

          Thanks for all the info. Will look into it. And I’ll say it again, too bad I missed the close encounter.

          Like

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