Palmer Park – Colorado Springs

I had two hours to kill after dropping Melisa off at her class. Since I had my camera with me, I decided to pay a visit to Palmer Park (you can read about the park HERE and HERE)

Palmer park rocks and trees

I’ll have other opportunities to shoot inside the park, but on this day I picked a small area where I could park the Tahoe, climb some rocks, examine other rocks, and spend an hour or so in quiet solitude . . . almost.

Palmer Park May 2015

This particular dead tree offers a lot of opportunities for identifying “faces” on its damaged and scarred bark.

Here; perhaps this is a little better . . . note also how it’s captured a young Ent and it’s holding it at arm’s length.

Palmer park rocks and trees

Palmer park rocks and trees

Let’s see . . . I see a pretty good Salvador Dali face near the bottom of the frame, the face of a whistler halfway up, and something that may or may not be giving me a raspberry near the top.

There are extra photos in the SmugMug Gallery HERE, but for the post I’ll try to keep it to only relevant captures. Of course, I’m fairly lax in my definition of relevant.

I liked this composition . . .

Palmer park rocks and trees

I was shooting with my Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 lens, and I noticed the focus points are not in focus. Annoying that.

When I bought the lens I did a few tests and programmed an adjustment into the camera specifically for this lens. I guess I’ll have to repeat the test and tweak the setting.

For them who might not know, we’ve been having rain every day for nearly three weeks now, and everything is soaked. On this particular day, I was out during a lull, but it was overcast, and most everything was wet.

Palmer park rocks and trees

The rocks are particularly interesting, but I’ll cop to postprocessing pixy dust having been used to bring out some of the colors.

Palmer Park May 2015

Palmer Park May 2015

Here’s another view of the tree . . . it turns out it’s not holding a young Ent after all; it’s just an extension of the larger branch itself.

Palmer park rocks and trees

I climbed a little higher . . .

Palmer park rocks and trees

Palmer park rocks and trees

Palmer park rocks and trees

Palmer park rocks and trees

It’s probably not a good idea climbing around these rocks on my own, especially carrying 15-20 pounds of gear that can shift at any time and make you lose your balance.

That’s how one can nearly sprain their foot and almost fall off a ledge . . . my foot is almost back to normal now, thanks.

I’m going to write something now and I don’t want any flack because of it. The comment is based on having traveled to Hawaii and seen exactly what I’m about to describe.

Palmer Park May 2015

That’s the type of rock that in Hawaii would have the locals put leis and offering of fruits on and around it to appease and incur favor from a perceived fertility god.

There was a can of beer near this rock, which, by Western standards, is nearly equivalent and probably more effective.

I mentioned it was cloudy, so I was shooting at f/2.8 to get as much light as possible through the lens. That made the depth of field shallower than I like. Take these two next two photos. The first one has the rocks in focus, and the second had more of the foreground shrub in focus.

Palmer Park May 2015

Palmer Park May 2015

I tried combining the photos and it did a pretty good job except for some of the branches show some ghosting.

Blended two shots

Blended two shots

That’s because the two shots are not exactly from the same spot. Oh, well.

By the way, notice the sad face carved in the middle rock.

Here’s an interesting rock covered with lichen.

Palmer Park May 2015

Just then, I heard the beat of wings and a Flicker flew by me and landed on the other side of the dead trunk. I changed lenses and swung around the other side of the tree so I could see the possible nesting site.

Palmer park rocks and trees

I can’t be sure that’s where the bird went. There was a small area of the circumference that I could not see from my vantage point. It could be the nest was on the opposite side of the above hole.

I waited for a bit, and  while waiting I occupied myself shooting the branches.

Palmer Park May 2015

Palmer Park May 2015

It was about then that the place was invaded.

Palmer Park May 2015

Palmer Park May 2015

One group came over the ridge to my left, and one group came around the base of the rocks to my right.

When they came in sight of each other, they proceeded to yell American Indian-like sounds at each other . . . or what passes for American Indian yells to children who have no idea what American Indians yells sound like.

I did shoot a movie but forgot to take the camera off autofocus . . . sorry for the poor video quality, but the noise is well represented.

I went back to my shooting as the kids played cowboy and indians.

Palmer Park May 2015

Palmer Park May 2015

A short while later the groups decided to recombine into one big group. As the lower group waited, the ones up on the rocks headed back down.

Palmer Park May 2015

Palmer Park May 2015

A couple of the kids noticed me shooting and waved as I waved at them.

Palmer Park May 2015

As quiet slowly regained a foothold, I went back to my solitary ways.

Palmer Park May 2015

Palmer Park May 2015

I got up to the top of the ridge, and just had time for a few more shots before I headed back down.

Palmer park rocks and trees

Palmer park rocks and trees

This shot, along with a few others, is a contender for best shot of the series.

Palmer Park May 2015

Probably, the shot with the rocks and the tree trunk at the beginning ranks as my favorite, but this is a close second.

On the way down I passed a couple of clumps of cacti . . . they looked ready to bloom. I hope I catch them next week in full flower.

Palmer Park May 2015

This next one shows the buds the best.

Palmer Park May 2015

That’s it. This post has ended . . . except for the stuff below.

 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o o o o o o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Sands of Destiny on Their Way

Sands of Destiny on Their Way

Astute persons might have noticed these doodles, and correctly surmised they hold some significance for me, and perhaps for humanity at large.  

If you click on the doodle, and nothing happens, this is the link it’s supposed to go to: https://disperser.wordpress.com/2011/12/26/palm-vx-and-i/.

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Note: if you are not reading this blog post at DisperserTracks.com, know that it has been copied without permission, and likely is being used by someone with nefarious intention, like attracting you to a malware-infested website.  Could be they also torture small mammals.

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Please, if you are considering bestowing me recognition beyond commenting below, refrain from doing so.  I will decline blogger-to-blogger awards.   I appreciate the intent behind it, but I prefer a comment thanking me for turning you away from a life of crime, religion, or making you a better person in some other way.  That would mean something to me.

If you wish to know more, please read below.

About awards: Blogger Awards
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. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.

About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Colorado, Photography, Photography Stuff, Scenery and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to Palmer Park – Colorado Springs

  1. sandra getgood says:

    I have fallen in love with your picture of the tree holding the young Ent…possibly for scolding purposes. “Beware, Young Ent, there are human children nearby.” What a fascinating place to explore. Love the post.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Thank, Sandra.

      Truthfully, I did not see it in person. It was only after I was home and processing the photos that it jumped out at me. Another reason I like taking photographs. You see more of a place even after you’re no longer there.

      Like

  2. oneowner says:

    I probably could have spent hours at this park, too. I don’t mind other people around but I prefer solitude when I go out to shoot. I see people everywhere I go so it’s nice to be alone once in a while.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      That was a very small area, and I was there less than an hour. I will return for sure. Might even do something I seldom do . . . bring my tripod.

      Like

  3. Very enjoyable photos. I could “see” all sorts of things in these pics. Faces, prehistoric animals, dragons, etc. The park certainly yielded a source of photography opportunities. It appears the dead tree is a desirable spot for woodpeckers.

    Like

  4. What a beautiful place to commune with nature! Love these photos…especially all the faces I can see in the trees and rocks!
    Funny how you can always tell when there are children a-foot! ;-) :-P Great vid! Brought back memories of all the field trips I had with my kids, and the kids I taught in school! :-)
    Thanks for taking us on this adventure with you, Emilio!
    HUGS!!! :-)

    Like

  5. Fascinating Emilio! I like the textures and colours and in particular the tree. Thanks for the video…now I know what American Indians sound like ;)

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I have to ask; what class does Melisa attend? How to cope with a photographer nutter of a husband perhaps; you must surely have such classes in the US of A.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      She is taking a quilting class. As for coping with me, it’s been a “learn as you go” experience. Going on 43 years now. She’s almost got the hang of it; much as I try, I can hardly surprise her anymore.

      Like

  7. PiedType says:

    That dead tree reminds me of an Indian totem pole from the Pacific Northwest.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      The Ute Indians wintered in these areas . . . could be in older times they might have added their own decorative faces to it. As it is, insects and woodpeckers are all that see fit to leave their mark.

      Like

  8. For some reason, the second photo of the bare tree reminded me of the scarecrow in Wizard of Oz.

    Like

  9. AnnMarie says:

    I went to the SmugMug gallery as soon as I saw the link so I missed all your narrative as I checked out the lovely, textured photos. And I actually gasped when I saw the CHILDREN. But I quickly regained my composure as i fell easily back to viewing those natural landscaped. So wonderful and relaxing. Beautiful colors. Lucky you.

    Like

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