April 2013 Ducks and Geese

That’s right! . . . I’m still documenting 2013 photos, and I gotz lots more before I’m done.

Once again, we visit the pond behind the Monument Library. You might remember the posts from October and December of 2012, and my recent Brown Chinese Geese offering.

If you are bored with ducks and geese, just leave right now; the following don’t get any better than the above posts. But it is, in my biased opinion, just as good.

HOWEVER . . . it’s another long post; sorry, but that’s what I do.

Blue-winged Teal

Blue-winged Teal

Duck Pond Duck Pond

Them be a pair of Blue-winged Teal ducks, however, I have a confession to make. These were not shot at the library pond, but rather at a temporary pond by the side of one of the roads in Monument. I go by there once in a while because there is a Belted Kingfisher that hangs around the pond, and I hope one day to get a decent shot of it. So far, all I got are these kinds of shots.

Belted Kingfisher King Fisher, King Fisher, King Fisher,

Don’t bother clicking on these; there are no larger version, and they are not in the SmugMug gallery HERE. The quality is rather poor, and only looks so-so above because of the small size and extensive tweaking.

And yes, there is a SmugMug gallery for this post, but be aware many of the shots are already cropped pretty close to 1:1 resolution. Also, and it pains me to say this, some of the following photos are not as good as I like. I still included them because apparently no one cares.

Northern Shoveler

Northern Shoveler

That’s an example of a less-than-stellar photo . . . but I’ll stop pointing them out. Anyway, the Northern Shoveler is also known on this blog as the Jimmy Durante Duck (the link provided for them who be too young to remember the man).

Redheads

Redheads

I’ll call these the Tina Louise Ducks because Redheads Ducks seems boring.

This next one may look like a goose, but it is, in fact, the Domestic Duck.

Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond

Not sure what a Domestic duck is doing in this pond, but I’m glad it got away from wherever it was being held. 

Redhead trio and a Bufflehead

Redhead trio and a Bufflehead

Bufflehead is a weird name for a duck, especially one that looks cute. They are small for a reason . . . from Wikipedia we learn the following:

“Buffleheads have evolved their small size in order to fit the nesting cavity of their “metabiotic” host, a woodpecker, the Northern Flicker. Due to their small size, they are highly active, undertaking dives almost continuously while sustained by their high metabolism. They do not tend to collect in large flocks; groups are usually limited to small numbers. One duck will serve as a sentry, watching for predators as the others in the group dive in search of food. Buffleheads are among the last waterfowl to leave their breeding grounds and one of the world’s most punctual migrants, arriving on their wintering grounds within a narrow margin of time.”

For them too lazy to look it up, “metabiotic” means “too lazy to build their own nests”, or an organism dependent on another for preparation of an environment in which it can live. Think of them as teenagers, and you get the general idea.

I had a series of shots of this next duck, a Mallard, doing a rinse-off, but most of them were out of focus. I was shooting across the pond with my long lens, and it locked in on the sticks behind it. This was the only shot that came out.

Duck Pond

I did get a couple of series, including one of this Greater Scaup dusting itself off.

Duck 1 - 640x480

I had not noticed the frame option for the slideshow, so it’s a tad smaller than I wanted, but for them interested in details, all of the photos are in the SmugMug gallery. I’ll include a few of the individual shots below for them who can’t be bothered.

Duck Pond

Duck Pond

Duck Pond

Duck Pond

Duck Pond

This next goose had the look, but not the coloring, of Canada geese. I’m guessing it’s one of the hybrids mentioned HERE of Domestic and Canada geese. 

Duck Pond

The Domestic Duck, meanwhile, also decided to dust off.

Goose 1 - 640x480

Here’s a few of the shots in that sequence.

Duck PondDuck PondDuck Pond

Here’s a shot of another Malard . . . that must have been one hell of a fart!

Duck Pond

As I mentioned in the October post, this next one is a Muscovy Duck. My birding reference list them as living in northern Mexico and farther South. This one is in Colorado. I don’t know if this is one of the pair that was here in October. Comparing the photos, I would venture a guess ‘not’, but if it is, I did not see the other one.

Duck Pond

This one was doing something strange . . . every 5 minutes or so, it would act as if it was trying to fly, beating its wings in the water rather forcefully. It was very loud, even from across the pond.

Goose 3 - 640x480

Actually, it looked as if it was trying to do the breaststroke  atop the water. Here’s a few of those shots.

Duck Pond

Duck Pond

Duck Pond

Here’s another sequence . . . 

Goose 2 - 640x480

Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond

I was wondering if it was hurt, but it seemed purposeful. I though perhaps that’s how ducks dust off in South America (something to do with the fact water flushes the opposite way south of the Equator – a myth, but still used by me when convenient).

Here’s another shot, just because.

Duck Pond

Here’s a few more shots of the hybrid. It looks like it had fallen asleep in the first shot.

Duck Pond Duck Pond

WHOA! . . . a Maverick flyby!

Duck Pond

The male was also landing, but it’s not in focus, so all you get is the female landing (no animation this time – just the individual photos). By the way, I’m listening to epic music as I write this (http://youtu.be/545WQt7N7fU?t=1h34m28s).

Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond

Neat.

Mallard Drakes have great coloring, but it’s sometimes difficult to get it to show well . . . 

Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond

And here’s the hybrid coming back to give me another shot of it, this time closer.

Duck Pond Duck Pond

And another Shoveler shot . . . 

Duck Pond

Here’s a sequence showing a larger view of what’s happening . . . Muscovy still dusting, some ducks landing, one taking off . . . it’s a busy time on the pond.

Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond

People like Canada Geese . . . these are for people.

Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond

Next, we have an American Coot. No, not a self-portrait, but that of the duck by the same name.

Duck Pond Duck Pond Duck Pond

The lighting is not great on any of those, but that’s what I got, so it’s what you get.

I’m going to close with a Mallard Drake . . . it amazes me how, depending on the light, reflections, and so on, their colors can change drastically. The previous shots are lit better, but I’m including this just because of the different coloring.

Portions of the next shot are blown out, but it also shows a lot of detail in the areas which are not. Clicking on the photo will get you a larger version, but the full size is probably better still . . . in the SmugMug gallery.

Duck Pond

That’s it. This post has ended . . . except for the stuff below.

 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o o o o o o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Deluge

Deluge

Astute persons might have noticed these doodles, and correctly surmised they hold some significance for me, and perhaps for humanity at large.  

If you click on the doodle, and nothing happens, this is the link it’s supposed to go to: https://disperser.wordpress.com/2011/12/26/palm-vx-and-i/.

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Note: if you are not reading this blog post at Disperser.Wordpress.com, know that it has been copied without permission, and likely is being used by someone with nefarious intention, like attracting you to a malware-infested website.  Could be they also torture small mammals.

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Please, if you are considering bestowing me recognition beyond commenting below, refrain from doing so.  I will decline blogger-to-blogger awards.   I appreciate the intent behind it, but I prefer a comment thanking me for turning you away from a life of crime, religion, or making you a better person in some other way.  That would mean something to me.

Should you still nominate me, I will suspect you pulled my name at random, and that you are not, in fact, a reader of my blog.  If you wish to know more, please read below.

About awards: Blogger Awards          About “likes”:   Of “Likes”, Subscriptions, and Stuff

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. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.

About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
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10 Responses to April 2013 Ducks and Geese

  1. sandra getgood says:

    Definitely not bored yet. It’s astonishing to see the variety of colors and patterns on these ducks and geese, when someone take the effort to really look for it, as you do.

    And that belted kingfisher looks like a tough customer. Like to see more of him!

    Like

    • disperser says:

      He’s a frustrating bird . . . the moment I pull up, he flies to the far end of the pond, and at that distance it’s difficult to get a good shot without the tripod, but he does not stand still long enough. And he’s often in with the branches, which catch the autofocus before it catches the bird.

      . . . I am persistent, so one of these days . . .

      Like

  2. mvschulze says:

    These are near great shots for indecent shots! (Belted Kingfisher!) Like the music also. I’ve been away from the screen for a while – hope to catch up (unlikely) on some of your stuff over the past few weeks. M

    Like

  3. oneowner says:

    The Scaup is one that I’ve not seen around these parts. Beautiful bird, well shot, too.
    Yeah, lets see more Kingfisher.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Thanks. The Kingfisher is very skittish. I had another few shots in a post that I now can’t find, but they too were at a distance, with the bird recognizable more because of the shape.

      I suppose I’ll have to get lucky eventually.

      Like

  4. John says:

    As always, exceptional photos! I especially like the first of the Kingfisher shots…

    Like

  5. AnnMarie says:

    One of the great features of posts like this one is the interesting information you include and the many details one is able to notice about your subjects. It’s like a mini “Nature” program on PBS. I also am looking forward to what I’m sure will be a great sequence of Kingfisher photos to your liking.

    Like

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