A Chinese Bump in the Bill

We see a lot of imports coming from China, and many people are ambivalent about the fact. Me? . . . meh! I really don’t care a whole lot. There are complicated reasons for the state of global transfer of goods, and we might as well learn to sleep in the bed we made.

. . . there is one import I don’t mind . . . 

Click to larger version.

Click to larger version.

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot are those?

“Well Bob, them be Brown Chinese Geese. There is another model, the White Chinese Goose which is, you guessed it, all white. The Brown Chinese Goose has a black bill, whereas the White Chinese Goose has a yellow bill.”

Methinks there has been some cross-breeding going on . . . or, these were head-butting some White Chinese Geese.

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

I had never seen this breed before this particular afternoon in July 2008, and I’ve not seen any since. In reading about them, I learned they are a domesticated breed, so I’m not sure what these were doing in the pond behind the Monument Library. From the above shot, the one with the Canada goose in the foreground, you can see they are larger than wild geese.

Whatever the reason or circumstances resulting in them two geese being there, I was glad of it. They are beautiful birds (although I assume them to be just as prodigious shitting machines as Canada Geese – – maybe more so, them being larger, and all).

The sky was overcast when I was shooting these photos, but the sun occasionally peeked through, as can be seen in some of the later photos.

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

The other difficulty I faced was trying to isolate them. Perhaps the other birds were as curious as I was, but whatever the reason, wherever these guys went, a number of ducks and geese went with them.

That is the reason why, despite my best efforts, some of the reflections are cut off; I’m actually cropping other birds from the shot.

However, I did manage a few single shots . . . 

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

I particularly like this next shot. 

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

I noticed they had a propensity for swimming with their bills pointing slightly skyward, and wondered if they see better with their heads in that position. I could not find anything in the meager literature about that behavior, so it could just have been a peculiarity with this pair . . . still, based on my observation alone, 100% of Brown Chinese Geese exhibit this behavior. 

Come to think of it . . . Canada geese occasionally do the same thing. Oh well . . . 

I waited for the alignment in this next shot . . . 

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

That is another (observed) characteristic of this breed; their tail feathers point upward, although one goose had a more pronounced upswing than the other. Because of the difference, I don’t know if this is a forced display or a natural position of their tail feathers. Photos on the web show this to be more pronounced (or maybe just more evident) in the water than on land.

Here are a few with a bit of sun shining on the birds . . . 

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

According to Wikipedia, Chinese geese are among the better laying breeds of geese. A female Chinese goose can lay 50–60 eggs over the course of the breeding season (February to June), although there are reports of Chinese Geese laying up to 100 eggs during that time. (text is a direct copy of the Wikipedia entry)

That’s something like between 3 to 6 eggs a week. Wikipedia does not mention anything about golden eggs . . . 

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Maybe that is why their tails are up in the air like that . . . why bother keeping it down?

Here’s a few more shots of the two of them together.

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

The problem with all them other ducks swimming around them is that the wake from those ducks disrupts the reflection of the geese in the water. Those would have been great shots if the water would have been undisturbed. Oh well . . . 

I want to take the opportunity to show a couple of shots treated with . . . I don’t remember which; either Topaz or onOne. Regardless, here’s the shots.

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

Click for larger version

I’m pretty sure the last one is from one of the Topaz plugins, so probably both are, but I would not put a whole lot of money on it; these were done some time ago, and memory is a tricky and pliable thing, often making up stuff when it finds it easier than the effort to accurately remember it.

There is no SmugMug gallery associated with this post. This particular shoot had other photos I want to eventually share, and I plan a gallery associated with that post. Still, these photos are fairly large. Click on the photo to get a larger view in a new window or tab. Once in a separate tab or window, if you hover over the photo and the mouse symbol shows a (+), it means you can click again to show it larger.

 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o o o o o o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

The Bells Are Ringing

The Bells Are Ringing

Astute persons might have noticed these doodles, and correctly surmised they hold some significance for me, and perhaps for humanity at large.  

If you click on the doodle, and nothing happens, this is the link it’s supposed to go to: https://disperser.wordpress.com/2011/12/26/palm-vx-and-i/.

<><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><>

Note: if you are not reading this blog post at Disperser.Wordpress.com, know that it has been copied without permission, and likely is being used by someone with nefarious intention, like attracting you to a malware-infested website.  Could be they also torture small mammals.

<><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><>

Please, if you are considering bestowing me recognition beyond commenting below, refrain from doing so.  I will decline blogger-to-blogger awards.   I appreciate the intent behind it, but I prefer a comment thanking me for turning you away from a life of crime, religion, or making you a better person in some other way.  That would mean something to me.

Should you still nominate me, I will suspect you pulled my name at random, and that you are not, in fact, a reader of my blog.  If you wish to know more, please read below.

About awards: Blogger Awards          About “likes”:   Of “Likes”, Subscriptions, and Stuff

Note: to those who may click on “like”, or rate the post; if you do not hear from me, know that I am sincerely appreciative, and I thank you for noticing what I do.

. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.

About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Feathers, Photography Stuff and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to A Chinese Bump in the Bill

  1. Wonderful shots Emilio. I like the colours of these geese :)

    Like

  2. AnnMarie says:

    Beautiful birds and great shots. I’ll be revisiting to get the larger view and to enjoy the detail.

    Like

  3. sandra getgood says:

    Marvelous shots, both in color and in black and white. ; I had never seen nor heard of this breed of geese, and think they are quite beautiful. And prodigious, if they lay that many eggs in a season. Your posts are always interesting. And so are your photographs.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Thanks, Sandy.

      I too had never heard of these until that day. I mean, I should not be surprised as I am not a passionate follower of geese breeds, but still, something that looks like that escaping my radar . . . wait; I don’t have radar.

      Like

  4. oneowner says:

    First we have to import geese from Canada and now from China? They are beautiful creatures, though and this is the great melting pot. Or is it a Caesar Salad?

    Like

  5. Eddy Winko says:

    I wonder what the eggs taste like, or the birds for that matter? I used to eat quite a few duck eggs.
    Love the last picture with the effect, very arty.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Alas, I cannot answer those questions . . . although the answer I usually get when I ask anyone “what does it taste like?” is “it tastes like chicken”.

      . . . and that is regardless what it is I’m asking about.

      Like

  6. These compositions and expressions with birds are just…. very good!

    Like

  7. Carissa says:

    Great photos. But 50-60 eggs!! Wow!

    Like

  8. Pingback: Project 313 – Post No. 232 | Disperser Tracks

Voice your opinion

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.