Flowers in Focus

These photos are selected from a much larger number taken between June 28th and July 14th of last year. I decided to leave the individual shoot format in favor of a sampling of shots so as to showcase only what I think favorably represents my flower-shooting efforts.

Columbine

Columbine

Columbine

We begin with the same columbine plant showcased in the previous posts . . . what can I say; I like columbines.

This next plant is a tad difficult to shoot, especially when trying to capture details of its structure and texture.

Flowers,

Not only is it difficult to shoot, but I don’t remember its name. I think I identified it once, but I can’t find the reference . . . so once again I’ll make stuff up.

Flowers,

The plant is known as Princess Medium Bloomers. More accurately, that’s the name of the flowers. The name comes from a tragic story of love, devotion, betrayal, and ultimate sacrifice, but since that’s difficult and lengthy to write, I’ll say this is named after one of Prince’s groupies. Specifically, what she threw on stage at one of his concerts. The girl’s name is lost, but the size of her bloomers is immortalized in these flowers.

As I was shooting these flowers, I had a visitor . . .

Princess Medium Bloomers

Princess Medium Bloomers and Fly

Petunias have funny names, so it’s too easy making fun of them . . . instead, I’ll tell you where the name comes from. It’s from a largely forgotten language from the Bikini Atoll. After all of the population was evacuated for the then-upcoming atomic bomb test, one of the elders was invited to stay behind and observe the explosion . . . his one word exclamation became the name of the flower.

I’m probably wrong, but as best as I can translate it from what few written records are available, it roughly corresponds to “Holy crap on a cracker!” 

Petunia

Petunia

Petunia

Petunia

Reader might remember the brilliance of the peonies as they first bloom . . . well, like many humans, they get a tad wide in the middle, and their coloring drifts toward white. Unlike humans, they are still showy flowers.

Flowers,

I want to take this opportunity to apologize to peonies everywhere for comparing them to Paris Hilton . . . please rescind the hit you ordered. I mean, I admire the effort and dedication of the gnat hit-squad you hired, but honestly, I’m tired of swatting at them. Sure, their expressions are funny, but you can only squash so many before they start to all look alike.

Hit-gnat no more

Hit-gnat no more

Stella D’Oro lilies are named after the company that used to make my favorite cookies in the whole universe: Como Delights. They stopped making them, and for that, they are dead to me now. The company, not the flower.

Stella D'Oro Lily

Stella D’Oro Lily

Well . . . actually, I still like their Classic Breadsticks and Egg Jumbos, but there are no stores within driving distance carrying either of those products.

I don’t know why these flowers were named after Stella D’Oro, but that’s the way it is. Here are two versions of one photo . . .

Stella D'Oro Lily

Stella D’Oro Lily

Stella D'Oro Lily

Stella D’Oro Lily

The pink geraniums attracted my eye more than any other flower in the yard. There were the light pink . . .

Pink Geraniums

Pink Geraniums

. . . and these were the darker pink.

Darker Pink Geraniums

Darker Pink Geraniums

But getting back to peonies . . . though they lose their color, their structure is still quite interesting.

Peony

Peony

Like humans, they get a little wrinkly as they age . . .

Peony

Peony

But most still look good . . .

Peony

Peony

The two clematis I planted last year did not fare well this past year. One did not bloom at all, and the other only managed a couple of flowers.

Clematis

Clematis

Clematis are named so because they clam up when you ask them questions.

Clematis

Clematis

I’m joking, of course. They are actually named after Johnny Mathis’s cousin, Clem.

Clematis

Clematis

I wish I could have gotten a better photo of this fly . . .

Gorilla Mulch Fly

Gorilla Mulch Fly

I think it’s a Gorilla Mulch Fly, named after the type of mulch it lands on.

Ah,” you ask, “but why is it called Gorilla Mulch?

Well, duh! . . . because Gorilla Mulch Flies land on it! . . . sheesh!

Gosh, it’s tiring making up stuff!  . . . let me show you a couple of close-ups while I rest my imagination.

Stella D'Oro Lily

Stella D’Oro Lily

Stella D'Oro Lily

Stella D’Oro Lily

These are close-ups, and even as large as I have them here, they still don’t look as good as they do in the SmugMug Gallery (HERE). Plus the gallery has a few extra shots not shown here.

I would have have said “kabluey”, but must admit it would not be as funny as  . . . PETUNIA!

Petunia

Petunia

That’s what others call “selective focus” . . . I call it “mostly out of focus”.

Petunia

Petunia

I mean, yeah, the small area in focus is nice-looking . . . but imagine all of the flower tack-sharp.

The interesting thing with these petunia is they did not have that coloring when we bought them. This striated coloring emerged a month or so after we had them. Prior to then, they were solid colored. I don’t know what happened, but I like the look of these.

Petunia

Petunia

I especially like the ones about to open . . . they are full of promise, of possibilities, and hinting at an exciting future.

Unlike this Princess Medium Bloomers . . .

Flowers,

It is obvious the upper right bloom has passed its peak . . . like me, it’s lost the vitality and vibrancy of its youth.

This is the beebalm plant . . .

Beebalm

Beebalm

Unlike last year, the plants this year did not grow to their full height, and had few and sorry-looking flowers . . . droughts will do that to flowers, but in this case I think the plant was hurt by a late frost.

So, the bees were not on the beebalm . . . they were over on the Salvia.

Bee and Salvia

Bee and Salvia

Flowers that did well included the Gran Paradiso Oriental Lilies.

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

 My imagination is still in “park”, so I’ve got nothing to say about their name . . . but I wasn’t the only one that liked these flowers.

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily and fly

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily and fly

Because most of you won’t go look at the full-sized originals, I give you . . .

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily and fly

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily and fly

The fly did something that made me break out into song . . .

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily and fly

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily and fly

My heart soared (metaphorically . . . otherwise it would have hurt like the dickens), and I sang out loud, startling my wife.

I’ve looked at flies from both sides now
From front and aft, and still somehow
It’s Como Delights I recall
I really don’t like flies at all . . .

Delphiniums look a bit creepy . . . and maybe a tad evil.

Delphinium

Delphinium

There is a most amusing story connected with Delphiniums. Back at the time of Queen Isabrutta, as Cliff Columbine prepared to set sail . . . Hey! A bug!

Stella D'Oro and bug friend

Stella D’Oro and bug friend

In my younger days (last year) I would look up what kind of bug it was, but as no one reads this stuff, I now just keep making new stuff up.

The name of that bug is Smitty; she’s a veteran of many campaigns on numerous lilies. Below she is on Lily-57e-OH3, the site of a hard-fought campaign against Killer Gnats. The conflict was written up in the famous book titled “The Better Aphids of our Nature“.

Stella D'Oro and bug friend

Stella D’Oro and bug friend

Where was I? Oh, yeah . . . Gran Paradiso Oriental Lilies. Here’s a bunch of them . . . a bunch; get it? Never mind.

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

Gran Paradiso Oriental Lily

I’m going to repeat myself, but that’s to be expected when I’m trying to log yet another long post. Mainly, I’m trying to see how many readers make it to the end. The goal is to reduce the number of subscribers, you see, and be left with just the hardcore long-form readers. 

Sadly, the number of subscribers keeps going up. Not my number of views, so I guess I’ll take the good with the bad.

Stella D'Oro Lily

Stella D’Oro Lily

Again, I’m giving the macro view, but this is really a 1:1 crop of a photo showing the full flower.

And here’s the clematis again . . . I like this photo because it looks as if the tendrils are rising from a cloud . . . by the way, this very flower was also featured HERE and HERE.

Clematis

Clematis

The other clematis plants did quite well (they are now eight years old). So well, in fact, that I had to add additional supports to keep it from toppling.

Clematis

Clematis

The purple is a difficult color to get right, and this has been adjusted from memory, but it’s pretty close. Certainly closer than the B&W version . . . 

Clematis

Clematis

I don’t think these colors lend themselves to B&W treatment, but since I’m trying to drag this post on, let me post a couple of more in color, and their corresponding B&W versions.

Clematis

Clematis

Clematis

Clematis

Clematis

Clematis

Clematis

Clematis

Yeah, not sure it does the trick, but it got me at least a couple of more screens worth of scrolling.

By the way, you might notice small yellowish streaks on the flowers . . . 

Clematis

Clematis

These little bugs are called Specklinettes Adornis. Honest, you can look it up as soon as I convince the proper authorities to adopt the name. Well . . . as soon as I find the proper authorities who I will then attempt to convince to adopt the name.

How about we return to the lilies?

Flowers, Flowers,

Oh! . . . I just remembered the Delphiniums!

Delphinium

Delphinium

Notice anything strange? Humorous? . . . anything at all? Well, I found this funny . . . 

Delphinium

Delphinium

This delphinium looked obstinately pissed off. Dang nab it, there’s no way he was going to open up and bloom.

. . . probably a teenager, thinking the world revolves around their snotty-nosed needs.

Meanwhile, the adult are doing their jobs, fertilizing each other, making seeds, etc.

Delphinium

Delphinium

This next shot is not all that great, but I’ve been trying for a long while to get a front shot of a bee . . . so I’ll share it despite the slight blurriness. 

Bee and Salvia

Bee and Salvia

. . . must be another teen . . . it looks as pissed off as the delphinium.

OK, I’m going to wind down with petunias . . . . here are a small sample of what’s in the SmugMug Album.

Flowers, Flowers, Flowers,

Next are two partial-focus shots I was going to combine in Photoshop to get a layered fully focused shot. Unfortunately, they did not line up as well as I wanted.

Therefore, please look at the next two shots, fix in your mind the parts of each that are in focus, then close your eyes and merge them in your mind. Do it look nice?

Flowers, Flowers,

And in closing, I was shooting this petunia . . . 

Flowers,

. . . when Guido dropped by. Guido is the familiar for the local vampire bats. He runs errands for them during the day.

Petunia and Guido

Petunia and Guido

Guido is a bit of a showoff . . . 

Petunia and Guido

Petunia and Guido

Well, if you made it this far I’ve obviously failed.

However, as I often say, it might be worth going to the SmugMug Gallery HERE.

 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o o o o o o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Piercing Observation

Piercing Observation

Astute persons might have noticed these doodles, and correctly surmised they hold some significance for me, and perhaps for humanity at large.  

If you click on the doodle, and nothing happens, this is the link it’s supposed to go to: https://disperser.wordpress.com/2011/12/26/palm-vx-and-i/.

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Note: if you are not reading this blog post at Disperser.Wordpress.com, know that it has been copied without permission, and likely is being used by someone with nefarious intention, like attracting you to a malware-infested website.  Could be they also torture small mammals.

<><><><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><><><o><><><><><><><><><>

Please, if you are considering bestowing me some recognition beyond commenting below, refrain from doing so.  I will decline nominations whereby one blogger bestows an award onto another blogger, or group of bloggers.   I appreciate the intent behind it, but I would much prefer a comment thanking me for turning you away from a life of crime, religion, or making you a better person in some other way.  That would actually mean something to me.

Should you still nominate me, I will strongly suspect you pulled my name at random, and that you are not, in fact, a reader of my blog.  If you wish to know more, please read below.

About awards: Blogger Awards          About “likes”:   Of “Likes”, Subscriptions, and Stuff

Note: to those who may click on “like”, or rate the post; if you do not personally hear from me, know that I am sincerely appreciative, and I thank you for noticing what I do.

. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.

About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Black & White, Flowers, Photography Stuff and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

33 Responses to Flowers in Focus

  1. Massi says:

    Bellissime Emilio!!!!

    Like

  2. sandra getgood says:

    I always enjoy looking at your flower pictures….especially in the winter, when the bright colors are particularly appealing. This post, however, is now one of my favorites, because of the brilliant and very funny narrative. If I had to pick a favorite description, I’d have to pick “pissed-off delphinium.” But it’s all good, and thank you for (once again) brightening my day!

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Thanks you, Sandy, for the encouraging words.

      The pissed off delphinium was not noticed until after I processed the photo . . . always a pleasant surprise finding new stuff in addition to what I originally shot. Like finding a double yolk when cracking open an egg.

      Like

  3. mvschulze says:

    First I’d like to say I did make it to the end this post despite your rigorous efforts to stop me. But I didn’t read the beginning… (yet)
    Second I would like to thank you for making me late to a breakfast appointment, walking the dog and even taking a shower. My life is screwed.
    This is the first time I’ve read your dribble, and frankly find it falling off the chair funny! Suburb Pictures, and hilarious comments. I’m hooked! M :-)

    Like

  4. oneowner says:

    My sympathy goes to Guido. I had a job very much like his and it sucked. Otherwise, good post.

    Like

  5. colonialist says:

    A goodly number and variety, indeed. Not fare for the butterfly blogger who flits and sips.
    You may have some botanists diving worriedly into their journals to see if they’ve missed some name changes!

    Like

  6. disperser says:

    So, not gonna happen, then.

    Like

  7. As usual, I’m blown away by the color and detail you show us. Bee and Salvia is amazing!

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Thanks . . .

      . . . although I was mildly disappointed not one person mentioned my extraordinary drawing skills. I thought the dead gnat was a spectacular effort to bring to life (figuratively) the annoying little sh*ts.

      Like

      • Oh the dead gnat was awesome! But it came before the bee, and the bee shoved everything else out of my mind. I do love that gnat though. I might put it on my desktop for a while. ;-)

        Like

        • disperser says:

          Now, why don’t I believe that?

          Still, lesson learned . . . in the future, drawing masterpiece after bee and salvia. Check!

          Like

        • In all truthfulness, I did laugh at your gnat. And I *am* going to put it on my desktop, so the next time I FaceTime with the granddaughter, it will be easy to show her. She’ll get a kick out of it. :-)

          Like

        • disperser says:

          . . . ah . . . it’s not PG-13. If you will notice, that particular hitgnat made a rude gesture before being caught between a palm and a hard place.

          . . . maybe she won’t notice.

          Like

  8. Millie Ho says:

    Great photos. What attracts you to flower photography?

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Mainly convenience . . . these are in my garden every year, and it’s easy to go out and shoot them.

      The fact they are beautiful have great textures, great details, and the occasional bugs are all plusses. However, my photography is as varied as I can make it. That said, animals, places, plants, birds, inanimate objects . . . anything but people.

      Like

  9. Good fucus. A lot of very beutiful ones, and I am (again) amazed of how many… ;)

    Like

  10. AnnMarie says:

    Veramente un bellissimo post-o da passare tempo divertendomi e apprezzare la bellezza della natura. That said, I want to add that your narrative is particularly entertaining. Ben fatto!

    Like

    • AnnMarie says:

      Oh, by the way, I was sad (for a bit) at the reminder of the passing of the Como Delights. I, and your other siblings, are in total agreement as to their rightful place in the All Time Favorites category!

      Like

      • disperser says:

        Mi sono divertito a scriverlo.

        And yes, when I think about what the world has lost, I weep for humanity. Literally billions of people not only never knowing the taste of Comos, but cruelly denied the change to experience it.

        In that regard, I often wonder if I should even mention Comos . . . it seems almost cruel to describe them so to people who can only dream about them.

        Like

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