The Chronicles of October 19, 2012 – Part III

The thing to keep in mind about his next set of photos is they span a period of just nine (9) minutes.  Also, except where noted, I am presenting them exactly as shot.  OK, with that out of the way . . .

The last bull photo was taken at 3:30 or so . . . and 6:22 p.m. found me outside, standing on my drive, with the camera’s viewfinder to my eye.

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OK, I lied . . . those were taken from my deck . . . and parts of them were blown out, so I adjusted the camera’s aperture and shutter speed. (Note . . . if your camera has the option to check exposure either in the form of highlighting overexposed portions or by showing you a histogram, make sure you avail yourself of them – like I said, this show lasted 9 minutes, and you don’t get a second chance).

I snapped off two more photos to check exposure . . .

20121019_1_DSC2836 20121019_1_DSC2835 A bit dark, but I knew I could play with them if I had to . . . but all I did was combine them into a panorama (below).  No adjustments of any kind; not even sharpening.  In part that’s because there is always the worry that people will mistake the word “adjusted” to mean “enhanced”.

I have showcased lots of sunsets and sunrises photographs in previous posts, and one thing to keep in mind is this . . . I typically tone them down.

20121019_1_DSC2836-2

These next two shots were taken specifically with the intent of joining them . . .

20121019_1_DSC2837 20121019_1_DSC2838

And here they are, joined, again without any enhancement or adjustment.

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What might I do to something like this?  Well, here are two progressively adjusted versions of the same photo . . .

Minor adjustments.
Minor adjustments.

Brightness, saturation, contrast, sharpening, deeper shadows, toned down the highlights.

This first adjustment is along the line of what I typically do with such a shot, and it’s  mostly to try and get to what my mind perceived.

A heavier hand with all those adjustments.
A heavier hand with all those adjustments.

The second adjustment is more of an artistic rendition, adjusted to make up for the fact looking at a photograph is less intense than watching it in person.

That was the view looking Northwest.  Here is the view looking East.

A very wide panorama.
A very wide panorama.

I was going to show the individual shots, but they would not convey the scale of the view.  Indeed, this fails as well.  Like all these photos, this particular photo can be viewed in full resolution in the SmugMug Gallary (HERE), but I also loaded it here, in WordPress, so clicking on it should get you the full (zoomable) version.  If the embedded link does not work, here it is: https://disperser.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/untitled-28421.jpg, and if that does not work, copy and past into your browser’s address bar.

I also have a narrower panorama, looking at the center lower third of the above view . . .

untitled-2851

And again, here is the link, just in case: https://disperser.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/untitled-2851.jpg

Neither of those have had any kind of adjustments, and you can see how much the colors have changed just in the span of a minute or two.

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The shot above was metered just above the brightest area, as I wanted to show the details at the horizon and the shadow bands emanating radially from the point of sunset.  However, I was not pleased with the “artistic” value of the shot, so I took a few more.  Each of the next pair of shots present the original, and the adjustments I typically make for these type of shots.

Original, as shot.
Original, as shot.
Mildly adjusted, toning down the highlights.
Mildly adjusted, toning down the highlights.

Toning down the highlights allow for more detail to show at the brightest spot on the horizon. When I do that, I try to boost the darks and shadows so as to retain the overall brightness and tone of the original.

Original, as shot
Original, as shot
Mild adjustments
Mild adjustments

Note the additional detail visible just above the mountains.  It’s a matter of preference as to which is more pleasing.

Also note that by then the sunset was trending toward the reds.  Here are three more pairs  of originals and modified captures.

First pair . . . 

Original as shot
Original as shot
Slightly adjusted
Slightly adjusted

Second pair (really getting into the reds now) . . . 

Original
Original
Slightly adjusted
Slightly adjusted

And the last pair . . . 

Original
Original
Slightly adjusted
Slightly adjusted

Note the adjustments on the last two pairs result in approximately similar final photos in terms of details and general appearance.

Anyway, that’s it.  That’s the last of the documentation for October 19, 2012.  

Perhaps it’s worth remembering there was nothing special about that day.  I just happened to stop and take note of what was around me, and in presenting it here I hope to remind others to take note of things they might otherwise miss on any given day.

There is an excellent talk by Harris on the matter of “living in the now”.  Essentially, it is worth noting the moment we live in, to be aware of what is happening, of what we might otherwise miss.  Now, I know it is ironic that a lesson about living in the now comes from a sunset from nearly six months ago.

But the point is this . . . I had a choice that day.  I could have just blown by those hawks, those cows, and I could have nodded at the sunset, and said “That’s nice” as I turned to do some other menial thing.  Instead, I took the time to be truly aware of all those instances.  

Sure, you cannot live totally in the now.  We must learn from the past, plan for the future, but don’t ever forget that there is value in absorbing each and every “present” we can . . . for it will be gone all too soon.  

Well, enough philosophical crap . . . it’s time for the wind-down.

If you enjoyed this moment, found the photos inspiring, found the description to be an easy form of learning, and the writing clever and full of mirth, feel free to share it.  However, if you hated the whole thing, and consider it a waste of time . . . why, then, it’s the perfect thing to forward to people you do not like!  It will serve them right!

Juggling
Juggling

Astute persons might have noticed these doodles, and correctly surmised they hold some significance for me, and perhaps for humanity at large.  If said astute person is curious about them, click on it for an explanation of their origin.

WordPress is still screwing around with trying to be a class operation.  As such, while they busily work to add features and themes I will never use, they are remiss in fixing problems like disappearing links.  So, if you click on the doodle, and nothing happens, this is the link it’s supposed to go to:  https://disperser.wordpress.com/2011/12/26/palm-vx-and-i/.  Note . . . there is no guarantee WordPress will keep this as a link, but at least you can copy it and past it on a browser’s address field.

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Should you still nominate me, I will strongly suspect you pulled my name at random, and that you are not, in fact, a reader of my blog.  If you wish to know more, please read below.

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. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.