Colors and Sights of Colorado’s 2012 Fall Season

Foliage 2013

The task of documenting the Alaska Cruise now behind me, I can tackle catching up with all the other photographs waiting patiently to get their turn.  First up, some of the sights I captured during the Fall of 2012.

Fall of 2012

Unlike years past, we did not do a dedicated Fall Color Tour.  We did the Alaska cruise instead.  But, I like fall colors, so I documented the colors of the trees in my yard.  Yup!  All of these foliage photos were taken by me after arduous 20-30 yards walks to various location on my lot.

Foliage 2012

I also have aspens, but they turned pretty quick, so I did not get many photos of them, and of those, the above is the best.

Foliage 2012

As is usual with these shots, they do not quite capture the intensity, the visual impact of these dying leaves.  The one just above can look like a dark copper when the light hits them so.  At other times they can resemble burning coals.

Foliage 2012

The above has been tweaked to highlight just the reds.  However, one does not need to tweak to show off these beauties.

Foliage 2012

Foliage 2012

We lost our Red Maple earlier in the summer.  It succumbed to frost damage from the previous winter.  Rapid and large temperature changes caused the trunk to split, and while it had managed to survive in previous years, sometime during the drought months of June and July it stopped drawing moisture.  Its leaves actually turned in August, and within a week, they had dried up and fallen.  I did not get any photos, as they did not look that good.

I also have a few shrubs that turn a nice red color . . .

Foliage 2012

The SmugMug Gallery (Colors and Sights of Fall 2012) has a few more foliage shots, and all the following photographs, available in full resolution.

Foliage 2012

But there are other colors of fall . . . although not as showy, they still have a certain attraction, and can attract discerning viewers.

Foliage 2012 Foliage 2012 Foliage 2012

Brown and tan are colors, right?

But I did title this post “colors and sights” . . . So, what are some of the sights?  Well, during early mornings we get frost . . .

Foliage 2012 Foliage 2012 Foliage 2012 Foliage 2012 Foliage 2012

If we get a bit of morning fog, the frost can look like a light snowfall.

Foliage 2012

What else do we see . . . these guys:

Foliage 2012 Foliage 2012 Foliage 2012

I’m pretty sure they are around all the time, but I seem them most often in the fall.  These turkeys were photographed during one of our day-drives (meaning, leaving early in the morning, and getting back home before dark).

During the evenings, if one is in the right place, one can catch sight of some of the migrating geese.

Migrating Geese 2012

Do you see the hawk on one of the poles . . . I can spot them a half mile away, but this one was out of my reach.  I did use the long lens to catch the geese landing on a field.

Migrating Geese 2012

This next one is from my yard, and I think it may be from a dove . . . just thought it looked nice.

Feather

Finally, the weather is a bit more unsettled in the fall, so one can catch sight of decent cloud formations (there will be more in future posts), and they can be quite spectacular at sundown.

Clouds at sunset

And, when the sun cedes the sky to the moon . . .

The Hill and Moon The Hill and Moon

The air is a bit crisper in the fall, making for less atmospheric distortion.  I have a lot of moon photos, but don’t know if I will bother posting them.    

And that’s it for now.  If you enjoyed the tour, please share your joy with those who mean something in your life.  If you did not enjoy it, then by all means be stoic, and keep the suffering to yourself.

Fancy Mesmerized

Fancy Mesmerized

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About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Black and White, Feathers, Flowers, Photography Stuff, Wildflowers and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

33 Responses to Colors and Sights of Colorado’s 2012 Fall Season

  1. oneowner says:

    Excellent series. I think it’s every photographers duty to photograph fall colors no matter where they live (except Hawaii). We have quite a few turkeys here, too, but they seem to be more elusive than your’s. Haven’t taken a good shot of them yet. (Key work = yet).

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Hmmm . . . somehow I missed these comments. I would point you to the advice I give below with regards to having plenty of opportunities to view them.

      And, in all fairness, these were probably 150-200 feet away.

      Like

  2. Beautiful! I too will add we have Wild turkeys in our woods. Tried to get a photo of one in my yard and as I crept closer it took to the sky and flew through the woods and the fields beyond. I’ve seen turkeys fly into the trees but never as far as this one did.

    Like

  3. jmgoyder says:

    It’s Autumn here but we don’t get these colours, although I remember them from childhood in Canada – fantastic photos!

    Like

    • disperser says:

      The typical colors are here are more along the yellows (aspens and cottonwoods). These are not native to the area. The previous owners had planted them, and I’m trying to help them survive the harsh conditions.

      Like

  4. Great colours and light. And I would love to see some wild turkeys some day..

    Like

  5. ntexas99 says:

    loved all the red and gold and orange colors of the season … beautifully photographed … I think my most favorite photo in this series was the one with the clouds over the hilly horizon … gorgeous shot

    Like

  6. AnnMarie says:

    Me thinks these are superb photos (especially the first leaf close-up, the pink/teal grass, and the pine cone) but I particularly enjoyed your narrative leading seamlessly from one subject to another. And now off to SmugMug.

    Like

  7. seekraz says:

    Beautiful photos, Emilio…I rather enjoy the fall colors…with a little bit of dew and frost, too…and wonderful turkeys…have still never seen any out in the wild….

    Like

    • disperser says:

      What you need to do is buy a permit to hunt them, get all the gear, etc. and go out in the woods, sitting without moving for hours on end, using your turkey call to try and lure them close.

      You will not see any during the entire hunting season, BUT . . . you will see them the day after the season closes, and every day thereafter.

      It’s how it works.

      Like

      • seekraz says:

        It certainly sounds like it would work…I bought all kinds of fishing gear when I leaved there in the Springs…never caught a single fish…and now I see them in the mountain streams when I’m out hiking…..

        Like

        • disperser says:

          I don’t hunt myself, but have seen the same method work in a number of applications.

          For instance, I can sit there for an hour, camera poised, waiting for a hawk to launch off his perch . . . I take a few seconds to scratch my bu . . . er . . . nose, and in that small window where my camera is not at the ready, the sucker launches, and flies directly at me.

          There are other examples I could give, but retrieving those memories would just piss me off

          Like

        • seekraz says:

          Couldn’t imagine that you were a hunter, somehow…but I got the picture, so to speak…and more fitting with the hawk situation…have experienced that one, too…but with much less majestic birds…..

          Like

        • disperser says:

          I should clarify . . . I no longer hunt, and I never hunted turkeys. Not because of any ideological reason, but rather because hunting is hard work.

          The days of standing in the cold, chest-high water of a flooded field, waiting for ducks to come within range, and the days of quietly stalking squirrels in tic and mosquito infested wood, and getting up at 3 in the morning to trudge though distant fields trying to scare up a pheasant or two . . . them days be behind me (unless, you know, stuff goes to crap, and we’re forced into hunting for survival). Plus, you have to clean the game . . . you have not smelled something really awful until you’ve opened up and cleaned a duck. It literally gives new meaning to the name fowl.

          So, I’m not against hunting per se provided people hunt for food, don’t bait, and obey laws. Plus, it’s a huge industry, with lots of jobs and, in most cases, a direct benefit to habitat and conservation.

          Note: if someone reads this, and feels the urge to debate me about hunting . . . don’t.

          Like

  8. All beautiful autumn photographs and I agree that it doesn’t have to be the reds and oranges but it was just those coloured leaves that impressed me the most. I live in a limestone area and I don’t think the trees frequently turn red and orange, golden yes.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Hmm . . . I thought I replied to this already.

      The majority of fall colors in the area are aspens and cottonwoods, both leaning toward the yellow. These red ones are not native to the area. The previous homeowner planted them (as have many other homeowners).

      As I mentioned, I lost one this year do to frost damage (rapid and extreme changes in temperatures are not good for maples).

      I try to do what I can to keep them healthy. That mostly means watering them, including in the winter.

      Like

  9. Emily Heath says:

    Amazing turkeys. Wasn’t sure if they were turkeys or vultures at first.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      I’ve only seen (and photographed) vultures on the ground (actually, perched on a dead log) once. Otherwise I never see them but when they are circling over me.

      . . . oh, wait . . . those are anti-guns nuts. I kid, of course. Anti-guns nuts don’t pay me no never-mind.

      Like

  10. Beautiful photos, Emilio. It must be nice having such beauty in your own back yard.

    Like

  11. drawandshoot says:

    Beautiful images, Emilio.
    We planted a sugar maple here in autumn. I’m looking forward to watching it undergo its first “leafing” in its new home. Strangely, a couple of turkeys walked through my front yard today. We have a good number of them around but not usually so close! They are rather cool!

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Are sugar maples native to your area? I had estimated your climate to be similar to mine.

      I lost a red maple last year, but maples in general do not do well here (the lower parts of the trunk split due to the drastic changes in temperature – it’s not unusual to see a 40deg-F swing in a 24 hour period).

      Good luck with yours . . . maple butter is the best.

      As for the turkeys . . . did you snap any photos?

      Like

      • drawandshoot says:

        Yes, sugar maples are native – we have quite a big business in Maple syrup in Ontario and Quebec. We do get pretty good extremes in temperatures but not quite a drastic as yours. I understand what you mean about trunk splitting but the maple here seem to do well.

        No turkey pictures today but I have “shot” some before!

        Like

        • disperser says:

          Hey, perhaps you could name one of your teams the “Maple Leafs”!

          It’s the temperature swings that hurt. Having lived in Michigan, I can attest to constant, bone chilling, dreary, indeterminately cloudy days . . . but no big temperature swings.

          Like

  12. Eddy Winko says:

    Fantastic colours

    Like

  13. gpcox says:

    Terrific photos, looks like you had a great time.

    Like

  14. Pingback: Project 313 – Post No. 249 | Disperser Tracks

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