The Big Dump 2012- The Bugs Edition

Bee on Balloon Flower.

Bee on Balloon Flower.

I processed all of the photos from Late July, August, and early part of September (before the Alaska crusise), and there are too many for one post (or two, or three).

Soo-oooo , I’m doing a number of posts covering major groups of photographs.  And even then, I will highlight only a few of the photos.  I say it all the time, but this time I mean it . . . many more photos in the SmugMug galleries associated with each of these posts. 

This post is about “bugs”.  By bugs I mean bees, spiders, flies, and (what luck) a Praying Mantis.

Bee on a Daisy.

Bee on a Daisy.

Now, one might think the gallery (HERE) has nothing but shots of bees on various flowers.  There is a little of that, I grant, but there is much more (120 photographs).  As usual, the photos in SmugMug are much better.  By that I mean you see better colors, resolution, and you can view the native resolution if desired.

There are many bee shots in the Gallery.  But, some people like that.

There are many bee shots in the Gallery. But, some people like that.

Here are a couple I like:

You can see the pollen on its wings.

You can see the pollen on its wings.

This looks like the Salvia has the bee in a head-lock.

This looks like the Salvia has the bee in a head-lock.

As I said, many more in the gallery.  Next up, Spiders.  People have already seen the small crab spider in the preview, but here is a reminder.

Slightly zoomed out from the 1:1 view.

Slightly zoomed out from the 1:1 view.

Jumping Spider on petal of Cone Flower.

Jumping Spider on petal of Cone Flower.

These next few are of a spider that was doing a high-wire act right above our heads one day.  The lighting was bad, and I cannot identify it for sure.

First off, what the full-size photos look like:

As one can see, it's a small thing . . .

As one can see, it’s a small thing . . .

. . . however, the D7000 has enough resolution to allow some details to be shown.

. . . however, the D7000 has enough resolution to allow some details to be shown.

This guy was quite the arialist . . .

This guy was quite the aerialist . . .

Perfect six-sided shape.

Perfect six-sided shape.

We have seen the crab spiders on Salvia . . . I think this is a type of Orbweaver.

Full-size photo.

Full-size photo.

Cropped photo.

Cropped photo.

I think it may be a Marbled Orbweaver.  But I cannot be sure.

I think it may be a Marbled Orbweaver. But I cannot be sure.

Once I started looking for spiders, I was able to see them even when they hid . . . or tried to hide.

The legs give it away . . .

The legs give it away . . .

. . . and again.

. . . and again.

The other thing I saw more of, were flies.  These two offered some of the best shots.  One is a Drone Fly (a bee mimic), and the other I am not sure of.  Could not find those exact markings in books I have.

Drone Fly checking me out.

Drone Fly checking me out.

Exquisite detail on the wings.

Exquisite detail on the wings.

These things are small . . . who knew they had such detail.

These things are small . . . who knew they had such detail.

Another fly that posed for me . . .

Another fly that posed for me . . .

. . . and this one has a stinger (?).  Or maybe that's just a strangely-shaped nose.

. . . and this one has a stinger (?). Or maybe that’s just a strangely-shaped nose.

Another bug I could not identify:

Neat and unique markings . . . still could not identify it.

Neat and unique markings . . . still could not identify it.

In August, out hummingbird feeders started to get emptied each night.  We thought it was deer, but it turned out to be a raccoon.  The point of me mentioning it is that each night we would bring the feeders inside, and each morning I would put them out before heading off to work.

We also left the lights on overnight because of pranks being pulled in the neighborhood.  The combination of those two things resulted in these next photos.

The light would attract bugs, and me heading out early meant I would see them.  I think this is a Lacewing.

The light would attract bugs, and me heading out early meant I would see them. I think this is a Lacewing.

Likely, so is this.

Likely, so is this.

But here’s something which was neat . . .

This Praying Mantis was on the door frame.  All these photos are rotated 90 degrees for a better view of this specimen.

This Praying Mantis was on the door frame. All these photos are rotated 90 degrees for a better view of this specimen.

These were early morning (5:00am or so), and I used the flash.  I did not have a lot of time to do a proper job of capturing it, but all-in-all, I’m not displeased.

There's something reflecting the light from atop its head . . .

There’s something reflecting the light from atop its head . . .

It makes it look like it has a headlamp on.

It makes it look like it has a headlamp on.

This thing really kept an eye (maybe two) on me.  I had hoped to overlay some shots, but it moved its head, making it impossible to align multiple shots.

This thing really kept an eye (maybe two) on me. I had hoped to overlay some shots, but it moved its head, making it impossible to align multiple shots.

Finally, once again this year a West Coast Lady butterfly posed for me.

I like this shot.

I like this shot.

It’s unusual for these butterflies to stand still for long, but they must have liked the Cone Flower.

You can see the proboscis getting down in there.

You can see the proboscis getting down in there.

They really are odd-looking.

They really are odd-looking.

Like I said, it moved about a bit, but it sat atop the flower for a good long while.

Like I said, it moved about a bit, but it sat atop the flower for a good long while.

A decent shot of the markings.

A decent shot of the markings.

I really wanted this next shot . . . I had been moving around trying to get a good front shot.

As I was snapping the shot, a bee came and landed right next to the butterfly, driving it away.  Not a bad shot, but it is a tad blurry.  Too bad.

As I was snapping the shot, a bee came and landed right next to the butterfly, driving it away. Not a bad shot, but it is a tad blurry. Too bad.

As I said, this is a massive dump.  There are 120 photographs of just bugs (all in the gallery HERE).  I’ll be adding posts for the other categories as I find the time. 

That will take me to the Alaska Cruise . . . probably sometime next week.

Thanks for perusing my stuff, and if you like these photos, I highly suggest visiting the full gallery in SmugMug).

The Face of Happiness

The Face of Happiness

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About awards: Blogger Awards          About “likes”:   Of “Likes”, Subscriptions, and Stuff

Note: to those who may click on “like”, or rate the post; if you do not personally hear from me, know that I am sincerely appreciative, and I thank you for noticing what I do.

. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.

About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Macro Photography, Photography Stuff and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

26 Responses to The Big Dump 2012- The Bugs Edition

  1. sash says:

    such shots! :)

    Like

  2. oneowner says:

    Every one is a great shot but that praying mantis is scary good!

    Like

  3. Carissa says:

    These are all excellent. I think my favorite is the markings photo. Beautiful detail!

    Like

  4. Where do you find the time!?

    Like

  5. Great macro work, Disperser. And I LOOOOOOOOOVE your Like-button. Much too often I can’t find anything sensible to say, even if I really would like to….

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Yeah, I use it too. I had it off because (just like with this post) a couple of people hit “like” within seconds of the post going up. Obviously they had not read anything, and likely not looked at anything.

      But, most “likes” are legitimate. And know that if you are a WordPress subscriber, and you are logged in, you can choose “like” from the menu bar at the top of the post regardless if the bottom button is there or not. I still get the notices.

      Like

  6. Your macros are so good. I am hoping to get a macro lens bye and bye, but you are taking all the photographs I would like to take. It would be cheaper just to visit your web page. I love your bees in the Salvia.

    Like

  7. I like all of them, but that first picture of the bee is … elegant.

    Like

  8. Emily Heath says:

    Count me as one of your readers who appreciates bee shots :)

    Like

  9. seekraz says:

    Incredible photos, Emilio…such detail…can’t even begin to say what, or which critter I admired most…. Wonderful patience…and lots of work…thank you.

    Like

    • disperser says:

      Thanks Scott. I appreciate people appreciating the stuff I do.

      As for work and patience . . . it’s what relaxes me. I love going through my photos, sometimes discovering stuff I had not even noticed when I took the photo. To be able to share them is a bonus. A nice bonus.

      Like

  10. AnnMarie says:

    Besides the excellent photos, the post gets Two Thumbs Up! Love the colors and variety of subjects! And the SmugMug gallery is a real help in seeing the great details that are missed when one sees these bugs at normal size.

    Like

  11. Pingback: Hiatus Post No. 23 – Stuff from Before | Disperser Tracks

  12. mvschulze says:

    Phenominal images, EJ! M :-)

    Like

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