The Devil is in the Details

After we walked once around the base of Devil’s Tower, I mounted my trusty 105mm f/2.8  VR Macro lens onto my D7000, and we went around again.  This time I concentrated on the details of the place, mimicking Sarah Takes Pictures.

Now, I know it’s not the same, and I know mine are not as well-composed, but I sort of gave it the old college try.  One other thing; I don’t have the background for naming the various fungi, lichen, plants, etc.

So I made up stuff.  I hope people find this educational.  Oh . . . to spite some people who don’t like too many pictures in one post, preferring instead only “good” pictures be showcased, I am posting here all of the pictures that are in the SmugMug album (HERE).  You can still click on any picture to go to the SmugMug album.  The captions are the same. (Edited To Add: WordPress wiped the individual links, but the gallery link works.)

Various lichen, predominantly Lichenous Donnoit

Various lichen, predominantly Lichenous Donnoit

Linchenstuffous Magnifica covering a rock

Linchenstuffous Magnifica covering a rock

Another shot of it

Another shot of it

European Lichenigio Impresa along with Northern Canada Mossious Soffice. Oh, and some grass

European Lichenigio Impresa along with Northern Canada Mossious Soffice. Oh, and some grass

Barkus Gighentica. This specimen is only found in North America, most of Europe, and a couple of other continents

Barkus Gighentica. This specimen is only found in North America, most of Europe, and a couple of other continents

These are typically harvested to make Jigsaw puzzles

These are typically harvested to make Jigsaw puzzles

Usually they leave one back so they continue reproducing, and also to piss off people doing puzzles

Usually they leave one back so they continue reproducing, and also to piss off people doing puzzles

This arrangement are typical of male Grey Fox squirrels trying to attract birds. While the bird is marveling at this, the squirrel is stealing the eggs from the nest.

This arrangement are typical of male Grey Fox squirrels trying to attract birds. While the bird is marveling at this, the squirrel is stealing the eggs from the nest.

Very rare miniature Sequoia growing right out of a rock. These specimens typically grow to 4-5 inches in height, and are then eaten by near-sighted deer.

Very rare miniature Sequoia growing right out of a rock. These specimens typically grow to 4-5 inches in height, and are then eaten by near-sighted deer.

Kindling

Kindling

The Yellow Gliding Caterpillar (typically 3-4 inches in length and 1 inch in diameter) sometimes misjudges its landing, and gets smeared on tree trunk.  A rare find indeed, as ants usually clean this up within hours.

The Yellow Gliding Caterpillar (typically 3-4 inches in length and 1 inch in diameter) sometimes misjudges its landing, and gets smeared on tree trunk. A rare find indeed, as ants usually clean this up within hours.

Waiting for Alice

Waiting for Alice

Evidence of Two Yellow Gliding Caterpillars!!! . . . wow . . . I'm speechless.

Evidence of Two Yellow Gliding Caterpillars!!! . . . wow . . . I’m speechless.

This moss, Coveratus Fecesous, is responsible for beautifying much of the forest floor. It grows on animal feces, and thus covers the unsightly mess as well as acts as a shit-mine of sorts for unsuspecting hikers.

This moss, Coveratus Fecesous, is responsible for beautifying much of the forest floor. It grows on animal feces, and thus covers the unsightly mess as well as acts as a shit-mine of sorts for unsuspecting hikers.

Similar in purpose to the Coveratus Fecesous, this is the Coveratus Urineous. It grows taking nutrients from the salt found in animal urine. Gross, but interesting.

Similar in purpose to the Coveratus Fecesous, this is the Coveratus Urineous. It grows taking nutrients from the salt found in animal urine. Gross, but interesting.

The infamous Electric Evergreen  . . . you can see the insects it has stunned.  It has a range of nearly 6 inches.  Unfortunately, it seldom gets to consume all it's victims since it's growth rate is only a few millimeters a year.

The infamous Electric Evergreen . . . you can see the insects it has stunned. It has a range of nearly 6 inches. Unfortunately, it seldom gets to consume all it’s victims since it’s growth rate is only a few millimeters a year.

This clever insect mimics a dessicated leaf. You can make out it's one eye. The yellow streak means it's a male courting a female.

This clever insect mimics a desiccated leaf. You can make out its one eye. The yellow streak means it’s a male courting a female.

Just bark . . . with stuff growing on it.

Just bark . . . with stuff growing on it.

This rare Dessicatus Junckus slug is able to modulate the shape of it's outer skin to mimic evergreen needles and pine cones.  Unfortunately, if it keeps its shape too long, as this specimen did, it will freeze like that, and never get laid.

This rare Dessicatus Junckus slug is able to modulate the shape of its outer skin to mimic evergreen needles and pine cones. Unfortunately, if it keeps its shape too long, as this specimen did, it will freeze like that, and never get laid.

Euww . . . someone sneezed on this rock

Euww . . . someone sneezed on this rock

Barkus Gighentica. This juvenile was obviously damaged, and is not usable for any puzzle.

Barkus Gighentica. This juvenile was obviously damaged and is not usable for any puzzle.

This particular strain of lichen, Roadus Lineous, is often to make the yellow paint used in road stripes, especially the double no-passing markings, as those need high visibility.

This particular strain of lichen, Roadus Lineous, is often to make the yellow paint used in road stripes, especially the double no-passing markings, as those need high visibility.

Just some needles . . .

Just some needles . . .

This particular strain of fungus, Difficile Pryous, is highly corrosive to teeth enamel.  Some fringe botanists maintain it's harmless, and that it's the scraping of the teeth on the rock that actually damages the enamel. Regardless, one should refrain from trying to chew on it.

This particular strain of fungus, Difficile Pryous, is highly corrosive to teeth enamel. Some fringe botanists maintain it’s harmless, and that it’s the scraping of the teeth on the rock that actually damages the enamel. Regardless, one should refrain from trying to chew on it.

I was privileged to witness a rare conflict between the Canadian Moss and the teeth-damaging fungus. Obviously competing for precious rock real estate, the two are intertwined in a life or death struggle.  I plan to return in ten years or so to see who won this titanic battle.

I was privileged to witness a rare conflict between the Canadian Moss and the teeth-damaging fungus. Obviously competing for precious rock real estate, the two are intertwined in a life or death struggle. I plan to return in ten years or so to see who won this titanic battle.

This looks too gross to describe.

This looks too gross to describe.

This quarts is secreting poisonous substances aimed at deterring rock collectors. A strange adaptation since no one is really interested in this particular rock.

This quartz is secreting poisonous substances aimed at deterring rock collectors. A strange adaptation since no one is really interested in this particular rock.

The incredibly rare Rock Octopus mimicking an even rarer Fungous Umbrellicus. It would have worked, too, but the Umbrellicous is not native to this particular region .  I killed it for being uninformed.

The incredibly rare Rock Octopus mimicking an even rarer Fungous Umbrellicus. It would have worked, too, but the Umbrellicous is not native to this particular region. I killed it for being uninformed.

. . . it also chose a poor spot to hide.

. . . it also chose a poor spot to hide.

The remnants of the giant Selfwraptous Slug.  It propels itself by wrapping and unwrapping along its axis, and the spikes serve like spokes to glide over the terrain.

The remnants of the giant Selfwraptous Slug. It propels itself by wrapping and unwrapping along its axis, and the spikes serve like spokes to glide over the terrain.

These slugs live only a short time since they get all wrapped up in themselves. Sort of like Rock Stars.

These slugs live only a short time since they get all wrapped up in themselves. Sort of like Rock Stars.

Birds . . . dark, evil, forebodiing rock birds. Wait . . . this goes in the other gallery.

Birds . . . dark, evil, foreboding rock birds. Wait . . . this goes in the other gallery.

I found these remains behind a rock . . .

I found these remains behind a rock . . .

The foot looks like some sort of deer . . . maybe.

The foot looks like some sort of deer . . . maybe.

The pelt looks like coyote or fox . . . I have no idea what it was.

The pelt looks like coyote or fox . . . I have no idea what it was.

Like I said, I have no idea what this was.  I did not want to move it trying to check out the skull.  However, in the course of researching the bones, I came across these two neat sites that might help others when they find bones.

 
 
These are the Common Mozaic Bronspots fungi intermingled with a new species I will name Chewedious BubbleeGomma. There, I named it.

These are the Common Mozaic Bronspots fungi intermingled with a new species I will name Chewedious BubbleGomma. There, I named it.

The later stages of Difficile Pryous, where they are a lot easier to pick from the rock. Of course, by this stage they taste like dirty socks, so are mostly ignored by all but Opossums who, as we all know, will eat anything.

The later stages of Difficile Pryous, where they are a lot easier to pick from the rock. Of course, by this stage they taste like dirty socks, so are mostly ignored by all but Opossums who, as we all know, will eat anything.

This is actual Fungous Umbrellicus. . . . uh-oh. I killed the Rock Octopus for nothing. Damn! I hate it when I do that!

This is actual Fungous Umbrellicus. . . . uh-oh. I killed the Rock Octopus for nothing. Damn! I hate it when I do that!

Difficile Pryous in its prime.

Difficile Pryous in its prime.

The previous four photos are all enlargements of this photo.  It just goes to show you the diversity of population in one small piece of rock. Were they humans, they would have already killed each other.

The previous four photos are all enlargements of this photo. It just goes to show you the diversity of population in one small piece of rock. Were they humans, they would have already killed each other.

This is the rare Spinus Crawlaboutus mimicking a tuft of grass in an attempt to escape detection. Unfortunately, it's legs moved slightly as I was watching, and I killed it. Better safe than sorry, I always say.

This is the rare Spinus Crawlaboutus mimicking a tuft of grass in an attempt to escape detection. Unfortunately, its legs moved slightly as I was watching, and I killed it. Better safe than sorry, I always say.

A pine cone being devoured by the common Springus Grassious plant. Highly aggressive, the Grassious survives on these quick meals. Once fed, it will go dormant until next fall when another pine cone might fall next to it.

A pine cone being devoured by the common Springus Grassious plant. Highly aggressive, the Grassious survives on these quick meals. Once fed, it will go dormant until next fall when another pine cone might fall next to it.

That's disgusting!! O wait, it's Difficile Pryous. For a moment it looked like Nasoous Drippingus, a gooey, slimy fungus found in the sleeves of young kids.

That’s disgusting!! O wait, it’s Difficile Pryous. For a moment it looked like Nasous Drippingus, a gooey, slimy fungus found in the sleeves of young kids.

Scorched wood . . . a fierce battle once raged in these woods.

Scorched wood . . . a fierce battle once raged in these woods.

Beats me . . . looks like the stuff growing out of the ears of old people . . . I keep mine clipped.

Beats me . . . looks like the stuff growing out of the ears of old people . . . I keep mine clipped.

The root of no evil.

The root of no evil.

Obviously, it found out it was barking up the wrong tree, and left.

Obviously, it found out it was barking up the wrong tree and left.

Tree trunk doing its morning Yoga exercises.

Tree trunk doing its morning Yoga exercises.

Wait . . . sorry! . . . let's move along and give this couple some privacy.

Wait . . . sorry! . . . let’s move along and give this couple some privacy.

And here we are . . . A common Rock Slug bowling over everything in its path. I tried to kill it, but all I was able to do is bend my knife.  I suppose sometime it's best to let nature take its course.

And here we are . . . A common Rock Slug bowling over everything in its path. I tried to kill it, but all I was able to do is bend my knife. I suppose sometimes it’s best to let nature take its course.

And that’s it.  

I hope you enjoyed my botanical tour of the base of Devil’s Tower. The SmugMug album is  (HERE).

As always, thanks for stopping by, and thanks for reading my stuff.

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Note: to those who may click on “like”, or rate the post; if you do not personally hear from me, know that I am sincerely appreciative, and I thank you for noticing what I do.

. . .  my FP ward  . . . chieken shit.

About disperser

Odd guy with odd views living an odd life during odd times.
This entry was posted in Black & White, Devil's Tower, Macro Photography, Photography, Photography Stuff, Wyoming and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to The Devil is in the Details

  1. I surely enjoyed your botanical tour… and laughed about some of your comments..as usual…
    The picture of ‘waiting for Alice’ I find absolutely adorable as I love the story of Alice…just try to get into that rabbithole…do you dare?
    And the photos of the barks are great…love the texture and patterns.
    Thanks for sharing this all with us.

    Like

  2. I laughed my head off reading this. This is my favorite post of the day. I enjoyed all of the photographs. Really great stuff and tons of fun. Thanks!

    Like

  3. I cheated and went to Smug Mug to see the pictures. The captions are great, too!

    Like

  4. bluelyon says:

    As always, nothing like a little (or a lot) of snark to brighten the day. Great photos too!

    Like

  5. seekraz says:

    I rather enjoyed your photos and your neologistic way of naming the things you found. Inspiring…encouraging…thank you.

    Like

  6. disperser says:

    So, this and the previous post accounted for the highest daily viewership yet – 212.

    First, thanks to all who liked these posts, and second, I had fun composing these, so I’m glad they got some eyes on them.

    Third, thanks for indulging my warped sense of humor. I wrote the stuff for self-amusement, and did not know how it would go over. I’m glad at least some enjoyed it.

    Like

  7. Sarah says:

    Your naturalist notes are great. Who knew pine bark was harvested for jigsaw puzzles? Who knew such amazing interspecific mimicry (slugs to pine needles to caterpillars to lichen and on and on and on) was taking place?

    My favorites are–

    -“European Lichenigio Impresa along with Northern Canada Mossious Soffice”
    –the squirrel, bird-egg stealing arrangement (love the color on those leaves and the overall artful arrangement; fine job, squirrel!)
    –kindling picture
    –the sneeze rock. It looks kind of like an ink blot in moss…I mean mucus.
    –the “Just some needles” picture — I liked the soft light on the needles and the colors and composition. It makes me feel Zenlike and contemplative.
    -the Selfwraptous slug…what a fantastic form.
    –Sauron’s spy birds returning to Mt. Doom
    –the old people ear tuft flower
    –barking up the wrong tree (because I am sadistic and like seeing damage done to trees; also I thought the color of the sapwood was cool)

    Like

  8. Your “roots of evil” look like a delta.

    Like

  9. Mary Lou Rutledge says:

    I had to wait for time to go back and really look at these so now, I’m commenting. I like all the photos but the slug!!! Gives me the weebies. Nothing to do with the great photo!

    Like

  10. AnnMarie says:

    “Just bark . . . with stuff growing on it” is a micro of the macro tower, and I think its a great shot. Got a kick out of the pseudo-botanical names and totally enjoyed the photo journey on the ground floor. You’re right about the colors in WordPress compared to SmugMug. It almost seemed like a different album, the colors so vibrant and exciting, drawing my attention to the glorious details of the designs. Beautifully done!

    Like

  11. drawandshoot says:

    I’m lichen this post! :)

    Like

  12. Thanks for bringing me close to nature, and I must admit I actually looked very hard for the octupus… ;) And slugs wrapped up like rock stars.
    The sad remains must be some sort of deer it seems from the feet, a small one compared with the size of the cones…

    Like

  13. This post is lovely and also hilarious! The way you can rattle off those silly names is impressive. I sense this is a natural talent :-).

    Like

  14. Love your commentary! :-P I snort-laughed! And you taught me some scientific names!
    This post is Humorimous Snortenous!
    HUGS!!! :-D

    Liked by 1 person

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