Galveston Bay Boats and Ships

Shrimping Boat Heading Home
Shrimping Boat Heading Home

Shrimping boats heading home were one of the things I was looking forward to seeing on my return visit to Galveston Bay.  I did see a couple, but they were semi-shrouded in the early morning fog.  Nothing like my June visit (San Leon – The Rest of the Story)

Not many escort birds
Not many escort birds

The other disappointment with the sight of shrimpers returning home was the lack of avian escort.  In the summer each boat was followed by flocks of birds large enough to make Tippi Hedren nervous.  I also did not see anyone on deck sorting and cleaning the catch; probably a big reason for the lack of birds.

Colorful world travelers
Colorful world travelers

Although not as humid as in the summer, the bay was hazy most of the time.  This was due to the sun on most days hiding behind clouds.  When it did break through, it lit up the ocean freighters something fierce.

Whenever I see a freighter or other large ship, I think of the men onboard.  Traveling oceanic highways they move about the world to a different schedule than most.  I think of my own regimented routine; a routine confined to within 50 miles of where I live.  A routine governed by different schedules than them who sail around the world.

Yes, there is perceived romance to a ship that is disappearing below the horizon.  And a little danger, too.  Weather, accidents, pirates (pirates!!), significant distance from immediate help, from the conveniences we are so accustomed to.

It’s what makes me photograph them . . . I hold them here, against their will, captured on my digital canvas.

And, I can use them as metaphors.  For instance, a metaphor on marriage . . .

A metaphor for marriage: Step one: encounter on the open sea.
A metaphor for marriage: Step one: encounter on the open sea.
A metaphor for marriage: Step two - become as one
A metaphor for marriage: Step two - become as one
A metaphor for marriage:  Step three - split up, and go separate ways.
A metaphor for marriage: Step three - split up, and go separate ways.

I also saw one guy with a small sailboat.  He sailed about for a good long while.  It probably helped that the water was very calm.

He was pretty good, even when tacking against the breeze
He was pretty good, even when tacking against the breeze

There is an IP address on the side, so I don’t know if this was a living advertisement, or if the guy owned the company, or if he was just a big fan.

The shape and superstructure of ships makes me wonder what they are hauling, especially if unusual.  This next one, for instance, looks interesting.

Interesting Superstructure
Interesting Superstructure

Now, in these days of instant answers, one might be inclined to go look this stuff up.  Not me.  I rather imagine the purpose, the cargo, and the story behind the ships as opposed to going and find out.

In part is the realization that what I work out will likely be more interesting that the truth. Sure, if I really cared, I would look it up, but at my level of engagement with these ships, it’s better to just imagine.  For instance, I think the shot above shows three segments of a suspension bridge under construction somewhere.

This looks fairly conventional . . . and looks to be riding high.
This looks fairly conventional . . . and looks to be riding high.

I think this is actually an alien vessel (underwater) with a fake ocean freighter stuck on top as a disguise.  I mean, why else is she riding so high.

Interesting, isn’t it?  Ships have feminine pronouns.  I think it comes from the similarity between women and ships . . . you can’t see what baggage they carry, they can be dangerous, they can help carry you safely through life’s voyage, and they need an experienced hand to operate safely.  Yes, I’m trying to piss off the ladies (very few) who read this blog.

Ah . . . iPads from China
Ah . . . iPads from China

This last one is odd.  I think it’s a tug pushing some sort of stealth barge . . . at least that’s what I think based on the shape.

Barging in . . .
Barging in . . .

I would be very likely to live on the shores of an ocean if it weren’t for the hurricanes, tsunamis, salt air corroding everything, pelicans shitting all over the place, high humidity, oppressive heat . . . come to think of it, I would not be likely to live there.

But, it’s nice to visit.